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This Month in Exeter – 1922

Page added 29th June 1922 for the newspapers of July 1922

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Back to historic events in Exeter

Western Times

 

August 1922

This month's selection researched and edited by Pete Martin

EXETER’S NEW MOTOR AMBULANCE
OFFICIAL PRESENTATION

The official presentation the new motor ambulance to Exeter Division of the St. Johns Ambulance Brigade took place the Castle Yard on Saturday afternoon. The chassis was the gilt of the Joint council of the Red Cross Society and Order of St. John, and the body has been built by Messrs Yeo and Davey, of Exeter. It was designed by Mr. J Dodd (of the firm) and the work executed in the workshop under the supervision of Alfred Westcott. The new ambulance is admirably fitted up inside and is second to none in England. Special features are the folding rack for a second stretcher drop carriage windows with patent fasteners to prevent rattling, and first aid box which packs away conveniently underneath the seat. The interior, which is panelled so as to obviate any crevices for dust, is electrically lit on the C. A.V. system. The money raised by means of the rummage sale held in the Higher Market was sufficient to pay tor the building of the body. The fittings, such as stretchers, blankets, and first aid appliances, were presented by Dr. Greenwood, of Brighton - a gentleman who takes a keen and active interest in ambulance work.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Monday 07 August 1922

EXETER’S PUBLIC LIGHTING
TO BE IMPROVED.

Exonians will pleased to learn that the City Council propose improving the of the streets in the immediate future to a degree which, while not quite equal to pre-war brilliance, will be vastly different to what local ratepayers have experienced since the cessation of hostilities. According to the scheme, there are to be five electric lamps of 1,000 candle power in the main streets to be reduced at midnight to 100 candle power. The 30 remaining lamps in the main streets, including that at the Clock Tower, will be of 600 candle power. Four lamps, each of 100 candle power are to be placed on Exe Bridge, two to be extinguished at midnight. At a number of cross-roads where at present the lamps are only 100 candle power, there igis to be an increase of 200 candle power. All the other street lamps, numbering 540. are to be of 60 candle power. It is estimated that the improved lighting, will cost considerably less than an extra £100 a year.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Thursday 31 August 1922

EXETER ACCIDENTS.

While riding a motorcycle in High Street on Saturday afternoon, Horace Hoare, 11, Manor Road, Exeter, collided with the kerbing at the comer of Broadgate, and was thrown against the plate-glass window of Messrs. Timothy White, chemists. The glass was broken, and the cyclist sustained injuries to his hand and one of his ears.
In Summerland Street, on Saturday morning, little girl of seven, Violet Walling, of 60, Summerland Street, ran in front of a motor car and was knocked down. One of the wheels passed over her, and she had her left collar bone broken. She was conveyed to the Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, and detained.
Private Peak, Devonshire Regiment, stationed at Exeter, was thrown into the water through the upsetting of a skiff he was rowing on Exeter Canal on Saturday. Private Golliver, of the same Regiment, who was in another boat, went to Peak's assistance, and by means of a rope the latter was pulled ashore. Dr. Stokes was summoned, and Peak was removed to the Higher Barracks Hospital.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Monday 28 August 1922

EXETER MUSEUM.
LOAN COLLECTIONS.

It is rarely, writes a correspondent, that the lover of artwork in metal has an opportunity of seeing such a collection of Malay silver work as now on view at the City Art Gallery, and to the uninitiated it will be, no doubt, a matter for surprise that a high standard of artistic excellence should be reached in a region so remote as the Malay Peninsula. In looking at the varied assortment of salvers, dishes, bowls, caskets, buckles. tobacco-boxes, and other articles, one is impressed by the absence of repetition in design, the free play of fancy, and the masterly execution. There is a restraint in the use decoration which is in marked contrast with Indian and Chinese work. Another noticeable feature is the rigid exclusion from the designs of all representation of animal life. The Malay craftsman would seem to derive his inspiration from native plant forms, and to express his ideas freely, unhampered by patterns or models, as the work proceeds.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Saturday 26 August 1922

EXETER CITY.
PROMISING FOOTBALL PROSPECTS.
PLAYERS SHOW THEY CAN WORK TOGETHER.

Saturday saw the opening at St. James' Park of a rather momentous season in the career of Exeter City Football Club. The club's position in the football world last season, was none too enviable, and turned out to be matter of re-election to the League. Thus on, the play during the forthcoming winter depends a lot.
Those who attended the initial practice match In the hope of seeing revelations of talent amongst the directors' new catches were disappointed. The two teams were composed of the players retained from last season, with the addition of Bell at left back, end the new players, with Loram in goal. Rain fell throughout and it was not surprising in the circumstances the match turned out to be pretty well as ordinary as most practice matches are. The first half saw useful work being done in all quarters after a short period of uncertain play at the beginning, and the new forwards proved particularly pushful, but in the second half, until towards the end, the play fell away.
Curiously enough, the brightest moments came at the end the match. No goals had been scored to within a quarter of an hour of the final whistle. Shots from both sides had been fairly numerous ail through, but the majority had lacked accuracy, and the goalkeepers had not been very severely tried. Then came a rattling shot from Clark, the left half, which Fryer prevented entering just under the crossbar.
The new men had been attacking for several minutes, and Devlin had kept Fryer on the alert with some unexpected long shots, of which the centre forward appeared very fond. Suddenly Parsons, in the centre, broke away. Loram ran out, but Parsons was sure of his shot, and a moment later the bail reposed safely in the net.
Western Morning News - Monday 14 August 1922

EXETER MAN SUES HIS WlFE

An action was heard at Exeter County Court yesterday. in which a husband, aged 80, sought to obtain possession of a house occupied by his wife who is 73 years old. The plaintiff was William Peard, and his wife, Mrs. Emma Matthew Peard. lives 27, Mount Pleasant Road. Exeter. A discussion took place between the Judge and Mr. Norman Lake, who appeared for the plaintiff, as to whether a husband could bring an action against his wife unless she had separate estate; "His wife is himself," said his Honour Judge Terrell. "The estate of a man and wife under the old Common Law remains unchanged so far is not modified statute." The facts of the case were as follows: — In 1910 differences arose between the man and wife, and when the latter was ill the doctor told the husband that it would be better for her health if he went away. He did so, and they had only seen each other twice since. At the wife's suggestion the plaintiff agreed to sell the house and to give her £ 450, or half the purchase money, whichever was the greater. The house was sold for £650, and the defendant agreed to give up possession by Midsummer last. She had since refused to do so, and the plaintiff was placed in awkward position, because the house was sold on that understanding. The wife had 3 rooms vacant in a house which she owned in the same street. She had lived in her husband’s house rent free. In evidence Mr. Peard stated that when he left his wife, he made no arrangements with her at all. His Honour suggested that the inference from the evidence was that the wife should allowed to remain in the house for life. Mr. Lake contended that there could equally be drawn the inference that the husband was to return and live in the house when the wife was well. After further argument his Honour said Mr. Lake would meet with serious difficulties in the action as brought and suggested an adjournment till the next court for him to consider the legal points. This course was agreed to by Mr. Lake and Mr. S. Cleave for the defendant.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Wednesday 02 August 1922

APATHY OF EXETER UNEMPLOYED ASSOCIATION.

A meeting of the Exeter Unemployment Association was held at the Druids Hall on Tuesday evening, for the purpose of re-organising the Committee. There was a very poor attendance. The resignations of both secretaries were received, and it was stated that several of the Committee had also obtained work and would have to be replaced. Mr. C. E. Foster reported that there was between £10 and £11 standing to the credit of the association at the bank. He appealed to the members to take greater interest in their organisation and said the present position of the association was due to apathy on the part of the members. He warned them that the Mayor's Fund was dry, and that they did not do something for themselves they would be faced with a serious position next winter. As attendance was not representative it was decided to adjourn the meeting until next week.
Western Times - Friday 04 August 1922

NOVEL PLEA OF EXETER LABOURER.

In giving judgment in a workman's compensation case at Exeter on Tuesday, his Honour Judge Terrell referred to evidence, which was given at the last court, to the effect that the injured man was offered work breaking concrete at 5s. per yard and refused it, on the ground that the pay was too much.
"lt is the first time", said the Judge, "that I have ever known a workman refuse a job because the pay was too much. I don't know whether it is an indication that in years to come we may arrive at such an altruistic feeling in the building and other trades that we shall have strikes, not on the ground that wages are too little, but too high. That time has not yet arrived, however."
The applicant was John Walter Hodge, builder's labourer, who fell from a scaffolding, whilst employed by Messrs. Bradbeer and Son, St. Sidwell’s and injured his ankle. He was paid compensation for some weeks, and when he refused work offered him the payment ceased. His Honour said that the wages of labourer were now £2 7s. but, the applicant could earn that amount in breaking concrete at 2s. 6d. per yard. In that case he was not entitled to compensation as he would then receive above the present rate of pay. No order would be made, but the applicant would be granted a declaration liability against the defendants, and if at any time found he could not earn the ordinary wages of a labourer, he would be able to come to the Court again.
Western Times - Friday 04 August 1922

EXETER CANAL TRAGEDY.

The body of a man recovered from Exeter Canal, near the lime kilns, a day or two ago, has been identified as that Alfred James Grant, who lodged No. 5. Paris Street, Exeter. Grant had been since last Monday, when he left to go to Countess Wear. where he was employed on the road-widening scheme. He was an ex-service man. His wife dies about 18 months ago, and his two children are being cared for in Homes. An inquest will probably be held this afternoon at Exminster.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Monday 28 August 1922

BILLS UNPAID

From Our Own Correspondent, Exeter. Tuesday.
The Earl of Northesk has, I learn, been impersonated at Bideford and Exeter recently, and this has led to a disclaimer by him of debts contracted in his name.
The impersonator was a well-dressed and personable man about 25. He stayed at the best hotels, and although he had plenty of ready cash, left North Devon without paying his bills. Traced to Exeter, he cheerfully paid up. He gave the impression of a wealthy young " blood," bent on having a good time.
At Exeter his stay was short, as the proprietor of a leading hotel, where he took rooms, was warned, and in consequence, the young man's credit was stopped. The local police knew nothing of the matter until they read the genuine Earl of Northesk's disclaimer to-day. Lord Northesk, who is the eleventh Earl, succeeded his father last year. and comes of age next month.
Westminster Gazette - Wednesday 16 August 1922

ANGLER'S BICYCLE.
ALLEGED THEFT NEAR EXETER.

Two privates belonging to the Depot Devonshire Regiment, Exeter - Harold Procter, 21, and Albert John Tennant, 19 - were remanded until to-day, the Castle of Exeter, yesterday, on a charge of stealing a bicycle, at Upton Pyne, on August 12th. valued at £5, the property of Mr. Gomm of 46, Pinhoe Road, Exeter. The evidence was to the effect that the owner of the bicycle left it by a hedge in Exwick Lane while he went fishing. Being unable to find the machine a short time afterwards, he made inquiries, and learned that two soldiers had been seen going in the direction of Crediton with a bicycle answering the description of his own. He got into communication with the Crediton police, who encountered, the soldiers in Crediton. They said they were absentees from the Higher Barracks at Exeter, that they had bought the bicycle for 5s. from a boy, that they were “fed up” with the Army and were making for London. Subsequently they admitted taking the bicycle.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Tuesday 15 August 1922

PAYING OFF WAR-TIME SCORE.

Robert Knight, labourer, of Crownhill, near Plymouth, was sentenced to one month's imprisonment, with hard labour, at Exeter, for assaulting Charles Edward Pyne, sales manager, of Exeter. Both served in a Territorial battalion of the Devonshire Regiment during the war, Pyne being Knight's sergeant. When they met for the first time since 1916 Knight punched and kicked him, and when arrested said he was paying off an old score that he owed in the army.
Londonderry Sentinel - Tuesday 08 August 1922

DOUBLE RESCUE

Mr. A. T. C. Bates, of Fisher Square, Exeter, was sitting near the banks of the canal near Double locks, when, hearing a splash, he looked round, and saw a lad who had been playing on the banks with his brother, jump into the water, at the same time calling out, “That is my brother". Mr. Bates realised that neither boy could swim, so he, without a moment’s hesitation, jumped into the water also, and brought both youngsters ashore. The rescuer is the son of Mr. Bates, superintendent of the Exeter Swimming baths, who also has a number of rescues to his credit. He is a member of the Exeter Swimming Club, who are naturally proud of his achievements.
Western Times - Friday 04 August 1922

NEW MATERNITY HOME. GREATER ACCOMMODATION AT EXETER

The committee the Exeter District Nursing Association have acquired No. 5, Dix’s Field, for a maternity home. The accommodation in the existing home having proved quite inadequate to meet the needs of such an institution. The present home was opened in 1918 by Lady Owen, who was Mayoress the time. It was equipped with six beds, and during the first year twenty-six cases were admitted. In 1921 100 eases were received, and many applicants had to be refused for lack of accommodation. The present home provided for fifteen patients additional beds will, it is hoped to be a great service to many poor mothers in the city. The public are cordially invited to the opening ceremony on Tuesday next, and also to inspect the new home.
Western Morning News - Friday 11 August 1922

ALLEGED ASSAULT
AND FURNITURE SMASHING AT
EXETER.

Frederick Wilson, 52, Capworth Street, Layton, taxi driver, was charged at Exeter Police Court yesterday with assaulting his wife, Jessie Wilson, and doing damage furniture to the extent of £10.
Mr. Templeman, for the complainant, stated that the parties were married 1917. Last year the Exeter Bench granted a separation order and allowed the wife maintenance for herself and child. On Sunday week, defendant returned to Exeter and smashed some of the furniture. He would also have seriously injured his wife with a poker had not someone interfered. A sum of £50 lent to the man and woman when they were married had been repaid out of complainant's earnings. Defendant had lost money by betting and had wantonly destroyed a lot of articles at Longbrook Street, Exeter, because his wife would not live with him. If defendant would keep away from her, she would forgo the separation allowance.
Mr. J. R. Hill stated that had he not interfered he thought defendant would have done injury to his wife with a poker.
Defendant denied assaulting his wife, and said the furniture was his. Very little of the sum borrowed was repaid with his wife's money. His wife had refused to live with him for no reason whatever. Recently he gave her a gold wristlet watch.
The Bench considered the evidence regarding the ownership of the furniture too conflicting to accept either sides contention, and the charge of damage would be dismissed. The assault was not a serious one and defendant would be bound over to keep the peace for 12 months.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Thursday 17 August 1922

GIFT FOR EXETER AMBULANCE CORPS. GIFT FOR EXETER AMBULANCE CORPS. Presentation on behalf of the Joint Council of the Red Cross Society and Order of St John of a motor ambulance to the Exeter branch. Western Morning News - Wednesday 14 June 1922

 

This month's selection researched and edited by Pete Martin

July 1922


AN EXETER THEFT.

Alice Cass, a smart-looking voting girl, of fixed abode, was again brought before the Exeter Justices on Saturday charge on a charge of having stolen from 37, Blackboy Road, a purse and money, together valued at £4, the property of Katharine Erridge. The magistrates present were Mesrs. P. Kelland (in the chair), H. Hall, and J. Vlieland.
Accused, who was remanded from the previous Saturday, pleaded guilty.
Detective-Sergt. Edwards informed the bench that prisoner was a Londoner by birth and her parents were very respectable. On June Ist, 1916, she was charged with stealing and was bound over to be of good behaviour. She did not, however, observe her recognisance and was sent to an industrial school where she remained until 1919. Her conduct there was good, and in her present employment she was described as clean, and an excellent worker. She had, however, been associating with a man named Johnson, who had a bad influence over her.
Deaconess Brett, of St. Elizabeth's addressed the magistrates with a view to being sent to the Home for a short time.
The Chairman asked defendant if she was willing to go there, but she replied that did not wish to do so and would sooner abide by the decision the Bench.
While the case was under consideration, Cass, who had appeared cool and unconcerned, fainted, but soon came round.
The Chairman said it was necessary that the accused should be taken care of for some time, and she would, therefore, have to go prison for three months.
Western Times - Tuesday 18 July 1922

EXETER HIPPODROME.
MARVELLOUS ANIMALS.

If there are any in Exeter who hold the opinion that all animals which are trained for music hall turns are taught their acts by cruelty we hope they will visit the Exeter Hippodrome this week and take the opportunity of inspecting the pure-bred white Arabian mare and the three English setter dogs who take such prominent roles in the star turn which is rightly billed "The Act Beautiful." The animals are housed at Messrs Collings’ Horse Repository in Paris Street, and Mr. Utteridge who presents the turn, invites anyone interested to inspect them, either there or at the Hippodrome, after the performance. We are informed that it took eight years to bring the turn to its present state of perfection, and that the animals were trained entirely by patience and kindness. After seeing the performance last evening, we can fully accept both statements. Human beings find it difficult to remain like a statue for many moments, but the Arabian mare and the dogs, in company with their master and mistress, appeared last evening in eleven scenes, in each of which there was hardly a flicker of an eyelid. Tableaux representing hunting scenes, and others reminiscent of the war, are staged in a manner which at both houses last evening fairly brought down the house, and there must have been many who envied Mr. and Mrs. Utteridge the possession of their wonderful animals. It is not only the way in which they pose which attracts, but the expression on the dogs' faces. Especially noticeable is this in the case one of the setters in “The Accident,'' who looks up to his master with a pathetic expression of anxious inquiry. The turn is one which will appeal to every class of music-hall audiences, and even those who do not frequent variety performances, for it is a clean, wholesome, artistic turn in a category entirely by itself.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Tuesday 18 July 1922

SOLDIERS' MEMORIAL
ARRANGEMENTS FOR THURSDAY

The cross of Devonshire grey granite which has been erected at the reserved ground in the Exeter Higher Cemetery, as a memorial to the men who died in Exeter military hospitals from the effects of their services overseas in the Great War, is to be unveiled by the Mayor (Mr. P. F. Rowsell), and dedicated by Bishop of Exeter, on Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock. One hundred and eighty-eight men from various parts of the Empire are buried there, and the ground which the City Council reserved for their burial is the most prominent part the cemetery, in front of the two chapels, and not many yards from the main entrance. The whole plot has been enclosed by a broad kerb of Devonshire granite. The cross bears the inscription: “In memory of the men who died in this city from the effects of their services overseas in the Great War, 1914-18." On the tablets in bronze are inscribed the names of the men.
At Thursday's ceremony the Mayor will accompanied by members of the City Council, the Magistrates, the Governors of the Royal Albert Memorial, the Education Committee, the Guardians of the Poor, and representatives of the Forces. They will assemble at the Cemetery Lodge and will form in procession.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Tuesday 11 July 1922

EXETER MYSTERY.
MAN'S BODY RECOVERED FROM CANAL.

Mystery surrounds the recovery from Exeter Canal yesterday morning of the body of a man, aged about 45 and 5ft. 6in. height. It is considered that the body, which was fully dressed, had been in the water only a few hours. Up to a late hour last night identification had not been established and neither the city nor the county police had received report of anyone missing from the neighbourhood. The suit in which the body was clad was made by a local firm.
Western Morning News - Monday 24 July 1922

EXETER FIRE.

As a result of a fire which broke out in a shed occupied by Messrs. Claridge, timber merchants, at the Basin, Exeter, last evening, £200 damage was done.
The City Fire Brigade was summoned by a stableman, George Baker, of 9, Haven Road, and the outbreak was got under control in a short space of time. There was a plentiful supply of water. The outbreak is attributed to a spark from a chimney setting some sawdust alight. The property was covered by insurance.
Supt. Pett, who directed the operations of the Brigade, was assisted by his son , Chief officer W. M. Pett of the Shanghai Fire Bngade.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Wednesday 12 July 1922

EXETER BOYS
Charged With Begging at Topsham

Two boys, aged 13 and 8 years living in Coombe Street, Exeter, appeared before Messrs. H. G. Morgan (chairman), E. C. A. Bvrom, E. J. Mardon, and G. S. Harris at the Juvenile Court at Wonford Sessions, Exeter, yesterday, summoned for begging at Topsham on the 29th June. They admitted the offence, saying they were begging for food.
Mr. E. Pine, of Topsham, told the Bench that the boys came to his house and a asked for food, saying they were very hungry. They at first told him they lived at Lympstone and that their mothers had sent them out to get food. He questioned them, and they then admitted that they came from Exeter and said they would not beg any more. They, however, went immediately to the next house, and in fact begged at every house in the row. He also saw them come out of one of his uncle’s fields with a lot of green plums.
P.C. Gale said the boys begged at almost every house in Topsham. When he overtook them near Exeter, they told him they had walked to Exmouth, and being hungry they called at houses and asked for bread. They had no money or food with them when he searched them. He had received complaints at different times about the elder boy.
The Deputy Chief Constable (Major Halford Thomson) stated that the boys had visited Exmouth, where they had begged, and there were also complaints about them in Exeter.
An aunt of the elder boy said the latter’s mother was dead, and his father was at Taunton. He was a very naughty boy, and if he was given the birch, it would be a good thing for him.
The Clerk: But you are not his mother.
The mother of the younger boy said the elder one lured her son away.
The Chairman said they heard nowadays too much of people being unable to control their own children. People ought not to have children unless they could take care of them. The boys were placed under the Probation Officer for twelve months, the aunt and mother respectively becoming sureties for their good behaviour.
Western Times - Wednesday 19 July 1922

EXETER UNEMPLOYED.

A meeting of the Mayor of Exeter's Relief Committee was held at the Guildhall on Friday evening, where a statement of accounts was presented, showing the total subscriptions received to be £1,187 15s 10d (including the sum of £63 balance from the Unemployment Fund of 1908-9). The expenditure by the district committees to date amounted to £1,200 8s 6d. This included the sum of £113 2s paid to The Soup Kitchen Committee for soup supplied.
The hope was expressed that citizens who had intimated their willingness to subscribe, or make further donations if required, would be good enough to forward such subscriptions to the Mayor to enable him to meet the deficiency of £18 12s 8d which has been incurred.
The Committee resolved unanimously to suspend its operations until such time as his Worship should find it necessary to call the Committee together again.
It was further resolved that the grateful thanks of the Committee be given to the Chairmen and the individual members of the district committees for their valuable and strenuous work in connection with the distribution relief. The committee also expressed their appreciation to the Press for their great help and support. It is requested that tradesmen will send in forthwith to the chairman of the district committees their accounts for goods supplied upon orders of the Committees.
Western Times - Tuesday 04 July 1922

EXETER TRAMWAYS’ STAFF OUTING

Haldon, Chudleigh, Haytor Rocks, Ashburton, Buckfast Abbey, Totnes and Teignmouth were visited by members of the Exeter Tramways for their annual outing. The weather on the whole was favourable. Previous to starting from the Depot, the party posed in front of the camera, and were presented with souvenir programmes. At Haytor sports were held, great interest and enthusiasm being shown, and many exciting finishes were witnessed. The Manager, Mr. R. O. Baldwin, actor as starter.
The party visited Buckfast Abbey, and Totnes was reached at 4.30, tea being partaken at the Temperance Hotel. Mr. R. O. Baldwin, who presided, presented the prizes to the successful Competitors. Votes thanks were passed to the Manager, also to the Outing Committee for the excellent arrangements made. At Teignmouth the couple of hours soon passed and the party embarked for the Ever Faithful.
Western Times - Thursday 06 July 1922

EXETER MILK PRICES. - 1d. PER QUART INCREASE AS “TEMPORARY ARRANGEMENT."

The price of milk to consumers Exeter was raised by one penny per quart to six pence per quart from yesterday. This follows the announcement that the Dairy Farmers' Association had decided to increase the price from 1s. to 1s. 3d. per gallon.
The development is not surprising, in view of the drought which farmers did not expect. The dairy farmers' price has been accepted by the retailers, one of whom remarked to a Western Morning News and Mercury representative: "The consumer has really been lucky to have fivepenny milk. I consider sixpence normal in view of the circumstances. At the corresponding time last year, the price was sevenpence."
“The Exeter retailer has been in the habit since the war of having a difference of tenpence per gallon between the wholesale and retail prices of milk. Owing to the confusion which took place at the beginning of May the retailer has had only an eightpenny margin. Now it is only fair to all concerned to revert to sixpenny milk. The producer says the position is abnormal, and milk is costing more to produce, and the retailer has agreed to the increased price and to split the difference for the time being by accepting a ninepennv margin. It is only a temporary arrangement."
Western Morning News - Monday 03 July 1922

EXETER MOTORIST FINED

Negligent driving of a motor car was alleged, against George Taylor, of 10, Albion Street, at Exeter Police Court yesterday.
Evidence given by P.C Draper was that he was in Fore Street on the 29th June, opposite the entrance to Market Street, when he saw defendant coming down the hill driving a car. He signalled to defendant to stop as there was a horse and cart coming out of Market Street.
Defendant, however, turned his head and waved his hand apparent to someone in a shop. Witness had to shout to him and defendant then jammed on his brake. This caused the car to skid. It skidded a distance of 25 yards and across road to the right, just missing the kerb and the head of a horse that was coming from Market Street. In answer to the Bench witness said the car skidded to the right, and it was fortunate that it did, or it must have collided with the horse and cart. It was a near thing as it was.
The Magistrates (Messrs. P. Hughes and H. Campion) imposed a fine of 20s and 7s costs was imposed.
Western Times - Friday 07 July 1922

CHILD’S SCALDS AT EXETER

Yesterday Albert George Davey, aged a year and nine months, of Langford Cottages, Exeter, was admitted to the Royal Devon Exeter Hospital, suffering from scalds on the neck and face. While in a neighbour's house with his mother, he snatched from the table a cup of hot cocoa which had just been made. The liquid fell on the child's neck and face and caused serious injury.
Western Times - Tuesday 11 July 1922

UNFORTUNATE BEGINNING TO HIS HOLIDAY AT EXETER.

I have been overworked of late. I was beginning my holidays and a break on the top of a strenuous time always affects me”
This was the explanation given by Harold Charles Chapman, a Newport commercial traveller, to Exeter City magistrates yesterday, when summoned for being drunk in Longbrook Street the previous day.
P.C Pitts said defendant collapsed apparently in a fit. Witness rendered first aid and sent for the motor ambulance to convey him to the hospital. On the way it was found that the defendant was very drunk.
It was stated that the defendant had lost a considerable sum of money. Of the £30 with which he started his holiday, only £14 was left. The magistrates, Mr. Henry Hall (in the chair), Messrs. P. Kelland. and A. C. Roper, ordered him to pay 10s inclusive.
Western Times - Wednesday 05 July 1922

STONE THROWING NUISANCE AT EXETER.

Three boys, aged 13, 11, and 9 years respectively, were summoned at Exeter Juvenile Court yesterday, before Mr. G. T. White and Mr. P. Kelland, for throwing stones in Bull Meadow on the 29th June. They admitted the offence, and the Chief Constable (Mr A. F, Nicholson) stated that the stones were being thrown at other lads, and two panes of glass of a public lamp were broken. A short time ago some other boys were brought there for stone throwing, and then a man was struck on the head and injured. This stone-throwing needed to be stopped. Two of the boys (brothers) were fined 3s 9d each, and the third, the youngest of the trio, 2s 6d.
Western Times - Tuesday 11 July 1922

WOMAN IN EXETER CANAL

Screams from the direction of the Exeter Canal bank startled the occupants of Spring Gardens just before midnight on Tuesday. Hastening to the spot, Charles Seward, a labourer, who had been on the point of retiring to bed, discovered a basket filled with chattels lying on the grass at the edge of the bank, and a woman’s hat was on top of it. Further search resulted in the discovery of a woman lying in the water close to the bank and immersed to the shoulders. Other help being quickly forthcoming, the woman was pulled out of the water, and was found to be in a semi-conscious condition. The police were notified, and in the St. John Ambulance she was conveyed to the Royal Devon Exeter Hospital, where she was made an inpatient. It transpired that the patient was Mrs. Bond, wife of a labourer, and until recently living in Friernhay Street. For a week past she had been in the City Workhouse.
Western Times - Thursday 20 July 1922

ALERT EXETER CONSTABLE.

A Borstal boy on licence, who had escaped from the supervision of the probation officer in another part of the country, was smartly apprehended in Exeter early yesterday morning by P.C Edward Newman. It was 4.30 o'clock wnen the constable saw the youth in High Street. There was some straw in the lad’s cap, and in reply to the constable stated that he had slept in a lodging house and was going to fetch his bicycle, which had been left in an hotel garage. The constable took the boy to the police station where the bicycle—a new machine—was also brought. Then the police discovered that the boy was a licencee from a Borstal Institution and had left his district without giving notice to the person under whose supervision he had been placed.
At the Chief Constable's suggestion, the case was adjourned for two days, with authority to the police to hand over the youth to an escort, if any arrived.
Western Times - Wednesday 12 July 1922

VISIT OF LORD JOHN SANGER’S CIRCUS TO EXETER

With each succeeding year the popularity of Lord John Sanger’s Circus increases. The visit which the great show is paying to the Ever Faithful today will be heartily welcomed. The major portion of the success of Sanger’s is undoubtedly due to the fact that it has always provided the public with the most up-to-date turns, and has striven successfully to move with the times. Citizens of Exeter will today be afforded a performance worthy of the highest traditions of the original circus.
Included in the programme of 17 star acts there are elephant barbers, sea lions and performing horses, which is an education in itself. Indians and whites of both sexes provide a host of thrills for young and old by their equestrian feats. Other feats, clever and daring, are those of Mademoiselle Trevoni, the dancer, the horse empress, the acrobatic stunts of the Michelins, extraordinary trapeze artistes, giants and pigmies, and the performances of the Spanish equestrians, the “Mazarines”, Pimpo, the little wonder of the circus, possessing a long range of humour and wit, and can be relied upon to provoke rounds of side-splitting mirth. As an acrobat and horseman, he creates endless merriment.
Citizens should not miss paying a visit today. The circus is staying at Exeter for one day only, and will be accommodated at the Fair Field, St. Thomas. There will be two performances at 2.30 and 8.
Western Times - Tuesday 11 July 1922

A TIGHT SQUEEZE AT EXETER A TIGHT SQUEEZE AT EXETER Allowed as much space as possible, competitors in the obstacle race at Exeter Post-office sports found crawling under the pole by no means easy. Western Morning News - Wednesday 14 June 1922

 

This month's selection researched and edited by Pete Martin

June 1922

EXETER FIRE
The Danger of Bird Nests in Roofs - £200 DAMAGE

The danger of birds building their nests under the roofs houses was again illustrated by a fire which broke out last evening No. 48, Wonford Road, Exeter, the residence of Mr. Arthur John Chudley, printer and stationer of South Street. Birds had built their nests in the roof, and the movements of the fledgelings were the object of much interest to the occupants of the house. Sparks from the furnace flue are believed to have ignited one of the nests, and about six o'clock the back of the roof, a double gabled one, was discovered to be on fire. The Exeter City Fire Brigade, called by the St. Leonard's fire alarm, were quickly on the scene, and got to work from a hydrant in Wonford Road. Furniture was hastily removed from the house, and the firemen, under Superintendent Pett, soon succeeded in arresting the progress of the fire and extinguishing it.
A pathetic sight was the flames surrounding a nest full of young birds, all unconscious of their danger. The birds would not fly away, and the firemen tenderly took them out and removed them to a place of safety. A portion of the roof was destroyed and the damage is estimated at £200.
Western Times - Wednesday 07 June 1922

EXETER ACCIDENTS

A boy named Barry, who jumped off a flour waggon, on the Exeter side of Exminster yesterday afternoon, was knocked down a motor car. He was taken to the Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, where it was found he was suffering from cuts about the face and head, and across the hand and knee. It is feared that his skull may he fractured. The motorist, who was proceeding from the North of England to Plymouth, took the boy to the hospital.
Last evening an oak beam supporting planks outside No. 10, South Street, broke, and Francis Delve, of Colleton Grove, and Wm. George Fox, of Roberts Road. who were working on them, fell. Fox broke his fall by clutching the ladder, but Delve feil to the ground together with seven planks. He sustained a fracture of the left kneecap, and was conveyed by the St. John Ambulance men to the Hospital. Fox escaped with shaking.
In Queen Street, Exeter, last evening a horse driven by Mr. W. Wilcox, grocer, of North Street, and attached to a two-wheel cart, fell owing to the greasy state the of the wood blocked road. Mr. Wilcox and his assistant. Mr. J. Penwarden, were thrown out. The first named sustained cuts and bruises on the left elbow, left side of the face, the chin and hands. a bruise the head. The horse received abrasions on the off shoulder and back. The shaft of the cart was broken
Western Times – Thursday 29th June 1922

EXETER HIPPODROME.
GREY'S VISIT.

In these days, when every section of the community enjoys a visit to a high-class music hall, it is good business on the part a management to book a turn that appeals to many classes and not one. The announcement, therefore, that Nixon Grey, the well-known character-comedian is due at Exeter Hippodrome next, week will be cordially welcomed. Much has been said lately about the necessity of music hall artistes changing their songs, patter, and other stock-in-trade from time to time. Some comedians are content to carry with the same old songs without a thought whether audiences wish for a change. Not so Nixon Grey. He has an uncanny power of noting audiences' likes and dislikes, and from his large repertoire to which he is continually adding, is able to introduce numbers with which he instantaneously gets to his audience. Exeter's forthcoming could easily win a name with "straight stuff," for has a voice that many an acknowledged singer might envy. His quaint mannerisms, clever patter, and novel introductions to each number, however, add to the pleasing effect his resonant voice invariably produces. Nixon Grey can be relied upon to keep any audience merry and bright, and his turn acts as a sure pick-me-up to those who are down in the dumps. Wherever Nixon has been billed he has created a splendid impression, and audiences have gone away delighted with the variety and attractiveness of his presentation. Full houses should be the order of the evening at the Hippodrome next week, for audiences can be assured of a real jolly time in the genial company of Nixon Grey and the other clever turns Mr. Fitchett has secured to support this star comedian.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Thursday 22 June 1922

EXETER COUNCIL’S POUND-FOOLISH POLICY.
ALPHINGTON ROAD BRIDGE.

Within a week or so the stone-built bridge in Exeter, over which ail the G.W.R. main-line traffic passes will have disappeared, and its place taken by a steel structure. "Work was commenced yesterday, when half of the old bridge was removed, and a part of the steel one erected. Operations were started soon after daybreak and continued until dusk. Meanwhile all traffic was diverted onto the up line. Next Sunday the remaining portion of the bridge will be supplemented by the remainder of the steel one, and traffic will then be diverted over the down line. It is stated that the bridge is not being removed on the ground of being in any way dangerous, but for the reason that heavier and increased traffic causes more vibration. All road traffic through Alphington had to go by way of Cowick Street, while the Alphington Road tram service only extended to Willey’s Avenue.
Throughout the day the scene was visited by crowds of people who watched the operations with intense interest. Many expressed the opinion that it was bad policy on the part the City Council not to have fallen in with the suggestion to do away with the arch bridge over the pavement. It was pointed out by some that this was a perfect death trap, on account of the sharp bend in the road, and that the Council’s policy was penny wise and pound foolish, because the work would have to done sooner later, and the present opportunity being lost, it could only be carried out in the future at considerable expense.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Monday 26 June 1922

EXETER MAN’S CONTEMPTIBLE ATTITUDE

" I must say I have not had a case which I have viewed in such a serious light as this one since I have been Chief Magistrate of this city”, said the Mayor (Mr. P.E.Rowsell at Exeter Police Court yesterday, when George Knight, now staying at Kingsteignton was summoned for neglecting his three month old child during the past two months.
The Chief Constable said defendant and his wife, when first married, lived with his parents, but this, being an unsatisfactory arrangement, they took furnished rooms. About five weeks before the baby was born the wife visited a sister. Defendant seemed to resent this, for upon her return he smacked her face and told her to clear out, which she did. From that time to the present, she had not received anything from him. When the summons was served defendant said, “If this the attitude they are taking I would rather ‘go across’ for a couple of years than pay anything.
Defendant accused his wife of associating with another man, and said he was not to know the child was his. He denied telling her to clear out. She left him.
The Mayor said the Bench wanted defendant to say he would shoulder his responsibilities and make suitable provision for his wife and child.
Defendant said that if he obtained a room, he could not live there without the girl's mother interfering, and he would not provide for the child.
The Mayor said in that case the Bench would have to deal with defendant severely.
The Chief Constable said the girl was quite respectable and there was no reason whatever to suspect any such thing as that suggested by defendant.
Knight said the girl had signed a confession she had associated with another man.
Mr. Gibbon (Court Missioner) said defendant exacted this confession from the girl two hours after the child was born.
The Mayor said defendant's attitude was contemptible, and the Bench had decided to fine him £5 with the alternative of one month's imprisonment.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Tuesday 27 June 1922

EXETER CITY F.C. AND A THIRD XI.

At the first annual meeting oi the East Devon Area Committee of the Devon County Football Association, at the Friernhay Institute, Exeter, last evening. Mr. F. P. Cottey presided and referred to the formation of an amateur team in connexion with Exeter City Club. The idea was that the teams in the area should furnish the Exeter Club with amateurs to form a third team, which would not only advance the class of the local football, but would act as a feeder the City 2nd XI.
Three nominations had been received for the post of hon. secretary, vacated by the resignation of Mr. Martin, but each withdrew. Mr. Cottey offered to carry on in that position until a secretary could be elected at the adjourned annual meeting. The Chairman presented the East Devon Cup medals to Pinhoe (winners) and Topsham St. Margaret's (runners-up), and the " Football Express Cup medals to Willey's Cadets (winners) and Beer (runners-up).
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Thursday 15 June 1922

GUILDFORD TO EXETER AND BACK

Members of the Surrey Motor Cycling Club left Guildford at midnight for a reliability trial to Exeter and back. The all-night ride down was carried through under favourable conditions, and the first man was timed in at the bottom Paris Street on Saturday just before eight o'clock, the local arrangements being satisfactorily carried through by Messrs. C. C. Harvey and G. J. Davies, of the Exeter Motor Cycle and Junior Light Car Club. Breakfast was partaken of at the Bude Hotel, and the machines were garaged at the Wessex Works, Longbrook Street. Later in the day the men commenced the return journey.
Western Times - Monday 26 June 1922

ACCIDENT TO AN EXETER HORSE TRAINER.

Mr Jack Allen, son of a well-known horse trainer in Exeter, living at Bendor House, St. Thomas, met with a serious accident yesterday afternoon. He was riding a horse through Hele Road to Howell Road when the anima! stumbled and fell. The rider was thrown, and falling on his head he was rendered unconscious. Aid was rendered by Nurse Tomlinson of the Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, and the injured man was afterwards conveyed to the Hospital. The patient’s head was badly injured and his right eye damaged. He suffered from concussion, but later inquiry disclosed that Mr. Allen had recovered consciousness and was comfortable.
Western Times - Friday 30 June 1922

EXCITING INCIDENT AT EXETER

Yesterday afternoon a horse attached to a Sutton delivery trolley, while standing outside one of the houses in Dix’s Field, Exeter, took fright and belted into Southernhay, where it attempted to turn towards High-street, but, owing to the sloping nature of the road, slipped, with the result that the front part the vehicle became wedged against the iron railings of Southernhay Green. This held up the runaway, which was secured. The shafts of the vehicle, however, were broken.
Western Times - Tuesday 20 June 1922

AN EXETER EJECTMENT CASE

An application for an ejectment order against George Bond in respect of two rooms at 23, Friernhay Street. was made the Exeter Police Court on Friday, by Mr. M. J. McGahey on behalf of William George Croump. The magistrates were Messrs. Delpratt Harris (in the chair), E C. Perry and Hall.
The grounds for the application were that defendant was seven months in arrears with his rent, and that he made himself a nuisance through his bad language.
Evidence as to Bond's conduct was given by neighbours.
Defendant denied that he made himself a nuisance. He said he had been out of work and had been unable to pay the rent.
An order for possession in 28 days was made.
Western Times - Tuesday 06 June 1922

WANDERING ABROAD AT EXETER

Practically blind, and of no fixed abode, William Back, a shoeblack, was charged at Exeter Police Court yesterday with wandering abroad and lodging in a passage in Tuckwell’s Buildings, on the 7th inst. The magistrates present were Mr. P. Kelland (in the chair), Mr.T. W. Ainge, and Mr. T. Bradley Rowe.
P.C. Pike stated that he saw prisoner sitting on the stairs in Tuckwell’s Buildings, and when questioned he informed witness that he was living there. It appeared that he had been to the workhouse for two or three days, but left Tuesday because was tired of the confinement.
In reply to Mr. P. Kelland, defendant said he was willing to back to the workhouse, and the case was adjourned for a fortnight see if he remained at the institution.
Western Times - Thursday 08 June 1922

EXETER VITAL STATISTICS
Effect of the Heat and Drought Last Year

Interesting statistics are contained in the annual report of the Medical Officer for Exeter (Mr. P.H. Stirk) for the past rear.
The birth rate was 18.89, and the corrected death rate 11.66.
The number of infants who died under one year age were: Legitimate. 92.36 per 1,000; illegitimate, 158.73; total, 96.07. The largest number of deaths (41) were from congenital debility, and malformation and premature. From diarrhoea there were 27 deaths. Measles accounted for nine deaths (all ages). The high number of deaths from diarrhoea was due to the high temperature and drought.
The total deaths from tuberculosis were 45 pulmonary, and 12 non-pulmonary. Of the former 38were notified, and of the latter 6 forty-five deaths were due to pneumonia.
There are 12 private slaughterhouses in use in the district, being one less than last year. The public abattoir was more largely used than the previous year. The number of seizures and surrenders of diseased meat, 637 at the abattoir, and 55 at private slaughterhouses and shops. Eighteen carcases condemned had localised tuberculosis, and the total weight of tuberculosis meat condemned was 4 tons and 12lb. Carcases with other diseases condemned totalled 6 tons 13 cwt 61 qr. 5lb. Imported meat condemned totalled 2 tons 6 cwt. 21 lb.
The number of new houses erected in Exeter during the year was 139, of which 130 were part of a municipal housing scheme. The number of houses found to be in a state so dangerous or injurious to health to be unfit for human habitation, 6; number found not to be in all respects reasonably fit for human habitation, 584.
Western Times - Friday 23 June 1922

GOOD NEWS FOR EXETER
CHEAPER ELECTRICITY:
MORE HOUSES: TRAMWAYS PROFIT.

A reduction of 12.5 per cent, on the charge for electricity to private consumers by meter from July 1 was approved by Exeter City Council yesterday, the Mayor (Mr. P. F. Rowsell) presiding.
The Electricity Committee reported a net surplus for the year of £6,803, and a reduction for current to the tramway undertaking from April 1 last was, on the committee's recommendation, carried.
The Tramways Committee reported a net profit of £1,560, against a loss of £733 the previous year.
The Mayor stated that as the result of a deputation to the Ministry of Health, and a reminder since, he had received permission to build a further 20 houses the Buddle Lane site.
In connection with the proposal for converting a portion of the Higher Market into a public hall, Mr. Vincent Thompson moved that a special committee be appointed to prepare a scheme for the utilization of this market for municipal offices and a city hall, with a view to the early provision of city hall in permanent or temporary form, which would not conflict with the general use the property to the best advantage.
Mr. Thompson wanted there to be no risk of a hasty decision, or of a scheme which the city would repent of later on.
Mr. Widgery seconded, with a view to saving time ultimately, and the committee was appointed.
Western Morning News - Wednesday 21 June 1922

EXETER HOTEL THEFTS
Soldier's Widow Who Forfeited Her Pension

A sentence of 28 days' imprisonment was passed on Lucy Ada Gill, widow, of 42, Preston Street, Exeter, at the City Police Court on Saturday on a charge of stealing a quantity of bedding and crockery, valued at £2 5s 6d, from the Rougemont Hotel. She pleaded guilty. The Chief Constable (Mr. A. F. Nicholson) said during April and May the defendant was employed as a charwoman at the hotel, and she stole the articles at various times during the period. A quilt was found pledged for 4s, and the other things were discovered in a room occupied by the defendant. Gill had since removed to the workhouse.
Defendant pleaded for leniency and asked for another chance. She said she stole the articles because she had nothing in the house at the time.
The Chief informed the Bench that the defendant's husband was killed in France in 1918, and because of her association with other men the Government stopped her allowance £2 4s 2d and took the two surviving children. Defendant since had two illegitimate children. In 1920, she was fined 20s for stealing wearing apparel.
The Chairman (Mr T W. Ainge) told the defendant she had had chances before, and they could not overlook the offence.
Western Times - Monday 12 June 1922

OUTBREAK OF FIRE AT EXETER

Exeter Fire Brigade were called soon after eight o'clock last evening to a fire at the premises of Messrs. Parkin and Sons, iron founders, in the Bonhay Road. Supt. Pett and members of the Brigade were on the spot within a few minutes with the motor engine. It was found that the roof of a large store was burning. The alarm had been given by someone who noticed smoke and flames issuing from the building, and before the arrival of the Brigade an attempt was made extinguish the outbreak means of buckets of water. The firemen soon had a jet playing on the roof, and within a short time the fire was overcome. The damage was not serious, probably amounting to about £30. The fire is supposed to have originated through a spark getting under the corrugated iron ridge and settling on the match-boarding beneath. It had probably been smouldering some time. None of the employees had been in the store since Saturday. P.S. Elford and P.C. Norton came on the scene directly the outbreak was discovered and rendered assistance.
Western Times - Tuesday 13 June 1922

GALLANT RESCUE FROM DROWNING IN EXETER CANAL

Whilst a boy named John Williams, of 30, Prospect Place, Cowick Street, Exeter was playing with companions at Double Locks, Exeter Canal, yesterday afternoon, he accidentally slipped and fell over the stone way at the pier head into the lock, which is 20ft. deep. There were two vessels passing through the lock the time. Mr. W. C. S. Hannaford, the lock-keeper at Double Locks, rushed to the spot and gallantly jumped into the lock fully dressed and saved the boy. who had sunk twice. It was an exceedingly narrow escape from, drowning. The boy was taken into Mr. Hannaford's house and attended to, and afterwards sent to his home. Mr. Hannaford has saved many lives from drowning at Double Locks. He has previously been awarded the Royal Humane Society's certificate tor saving life, and this is another of his plucky acts which is worthy of every praise.
Western Times - Friday 09 June 1922

SENSATIONAL INCIDENT ON EXPRESS TRAIN
NEAR EXETER

Charles Kingsley, aged 76, was being taken from Penzance to Paddington by a detective on the Cornish Riviera express, Wednesday, when between Exeter and Taunton he was allowed to leave the carriage. As he did not return, search was made, and he was found lying on the floor with blood flowing freely from wounds in the abdomen, apparently inflicted with a small penknife. He was attended by a doctor, who happened to be on the train, and a stop was made at Taunton to enable him to be sent to hospital. His injuries are not serious.
Western Times - Friday 09 June 1922

BROWNIES HONOUR LADY CLINTON BROWNIES HONOUR LADY CLINTON Brownies at the girl guides rally at Exeter paid honour to lady Clinton, together with their mascot, formed the centre of the dancing circle.
Western Morning News - Wednesday 14 June 1922

 

This month's selection researched and edited by Pete Martin

May 1922

EXETER TRADERS' ASSOCIATION.

A well-attended meeting of the Executive Council of the Exeter Traders' Association was held at 17, Bedford Circus, Mr. W. Wills being in the chair. Mr. F. J. Cornish was unanimously elected Vice-Chairman for the ensuing year. Discussion took place with regard to the Bill introduced by Mr. Macquisten in the House of Commons under which it is sought to lay down that all shops employing paid assistants shall only open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., there being, at the same time, no restrictions as to those employing no assistants. It was decided to offer the most strenuous opposition to the measure, as being unworkable and. as one member remarked, an example of “legislation gone mad." It was resolved that the shops which usually close on Wednesdays should close usual in the week before Whitsun. The Sub-Committee formed for the purpose endeavouring to secure increased membership were able to report having secured the services of a gentleman who would call on traders who are not yet members, but who, having seen the advantages to be gained by united effort, may now desire to come into the organisation. It was decided the annual summer excursion should be held about the middle of July, and a Subcommittee was elected to make the arrangements. A vote of thanks to the Chairman concluded the meeting.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Thursday 25 May 1922

EXETER CHILDREN'S PAGEANT. TAKINGS NEARLY £700.

For reasons that carry weight the suggestion that, following the final performance of the pageant at St. James Park by 4,000 of Exeter's elementary school children, those taking part should march through the main streets to the west front of the Cathedral and there sing the “Peace" song and the National Anthem was not carried out. Much as the City Teachers' Association, N.U.T. favoured, we are given to understand the idea—which, by the way was considered excellent itself—it was felt that, aft the three strenuous performances and rehearsal in which they had taken part and the physical strain on a broiling Saturday afternoon, it would he too much to take the children through the streets. While still adhering to the view that the procession and singing would have provided an object lesson to those with Bolshevik and Proletarian tendencies, agree that those in authority acted with discretion. However, the pageant proceedings on Saturday, which were again witnessed by an enthusiastic and appreciative attendance of the public—numbering about 4,000— were fittingly concluded by the singing of the Doxology by the children. It followed the singing ot the ever fascinating and appealing Recessional which must cause every loyal Englishman to think seriously.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Monday 29 May 1922

EXETER ACCIDENTS

Whilst Harold F. Keath, aged 17, No. 6, Grosvenor Place, Exeter, was riding a cycle up Paris Street on Saturday, his proper side, met a horse and van near the centre of the road. On passing it, he states, a motor cyclist taking part the A.C.V. trial, emerged from behind the van. Seeing Keath he applied his brakes, but was unable to stop in time, with the result that Keath was knocked from his machine and sustained slight injuries to his left hand and knee. The bicycle frame and right pedal were damaged.
On Saturday Charles Fry, 31, Paul Street, Exeter, was riding a saddle horse and leading another down Hele Road towards St. David's Station, when the saddle horse slipped on the stone sets and fell to the ground. Fry was unable to remove his foot from the stirrup and received slight abrasions to his right leg and knee.
Western Times - Monday 22 May 1922

AN EXETER NURSE. APPEAL TO THE LORD CHIEF JUSTICE

Miss Sparkes, of Carlton Terrace, Exeter, made a pathetic application the Lord Chief Justice in the King's Bench Division to-day. She said she was a fully qualified nurse who had been convicted at the Exeter Assizes on a charge of manslaughter in connection with a patient’s baby, but she was wrongfully convicted because there was in existence a confession of murder by another person. She begged the judge to help her to get her case reopened that she might once again be able to earn her living. At the moment she was living on the charity of her friends.
His lordship said he recollected her case. The manslaughter matter could not be reopened as it had been the subject of examination by the Court of Criminal Appeal, but Miss Sparkes could take proceedings against person by whom she was aggrieved. She had been advised to go to the Poor Persons’ Department for assistance.
Miss Sparkes said she had done so. Now she stood to be homeless, because she had been told that she was to be turned away from her house, His lordship said the Poor Persons’ Department had reported that Miss Sparkes was not the class of person who should receive assistance. Miss Sparkes: “If I am not a poor person, nobody is. I am absolutely penniless, for they have called in a mortgage of £400 and I shall be ejected from my house.”
His lordship: “I am sorry, for I should like to help you, but have not he power to make any order.”
Miss Sparkes: “You can prevent them ejecting me.”
His lordship: “I have no powers. If I were you I should at once consult a solicitor.”
Miss Sparkes then left.
Western Evening Herald - Tuesday 02 May 1922

EXETER UNEMPLOYED SECRETARY'S APPEAL.

A meeting of the Exeter Unemployed Association was held at the Druids' Hall, Exeter, yesterday, Mr. W. P. Trigger presiding.
Mr. W.P. O’Reilly, Assistant Hon. Secretary, deplored that some of the men were apparently trying their hardest to let the Association down. Already three men had been expelled, and several more cases were being investigated. Despite what was being done in the interests of decent members, the Association appeared to be lacking the wholehearted support of its members. He appealed to them to back the officials up and to make the concert to-day and the Flag day on Friday big successes. He wished to contradict the rumour that Mr. Foster and himself were paid. That was wrong and all money received was expended solely in relief.
Messrs. Shapley and Chilcott appealed to the men show a united front, and they were sure they would continue to have the sympathy of the citizens of Exeter.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Wednesday 10 May 1922

EXETER REVISITED. ALLEGED TILL ROBERY NY A FORMER LODGER

A young woman named Florence Emma Bradford of no fixed abode, was charged at the Exeter City Police Court on Saturday, with stealing 5s 6d from the till of a Paris Street shop. The magistrates on the benchwere Mr. P. Kelland (in the chair), Messrs. T. W. Ainge, and C. J. Vlieland. The Chief Constable said some time last year the defendant and her husband lodged at the shop, and then went to Plymouth. On Friday she called on Mrs. Gratton, the prosecutrix, and when a lady came to see a room she wished to rent, the defendant was left in the shop alone with the complaint's baby and little girl. Mrs. Gratton was only absent five minutes, but when she went to the till later, she discovered that a half-crown and six sixpences were gone. The defendant denied any knowledge of the affair and refused to turn out her pockets. When the police were sent for she picked up her hat and gloves and rushed out of the shop. The six years-old daughter of the prosecutrix saw defendant take the money from the till. Evidence was given and the Chief applied for a remand in order to make enquiries.
The remand was granted, the defendant being allowed bail if she could find a surety of £2.
Western Times - Monday 29 May 1922

EXETER TRAGEDY

A distressing occurrence took place last evening St. David's Church., Exeter. As the congregation were assembling for evening service, one of the worshippers, Mr. Francis William Tucker, of Danes Road, who had a minute two earlier taken his seat, was seen to reel and fall. Several members of the congregation hastened to his assistance, and he was carried outside into the open air. It was seen that Mr. Tucker was seriously ill, and Dr. Galbraigh, the medical attendant at the Ivybank Isolation Hospital, close by, was called. The doctor came immediately, but Mr. Tucker expired within a very few minutes, apparently from seizure. The body was conveyed to the Ivybank Institution. The service, which had not at the time commenced, was conducted as usual, only those who had been the church at the time of the sad event being aware that anything untoward had happened. Two of deceased's grandsons are members of the choir, and they were not informed until later of what had occurred.
Mr. Tucker, who was in his 73rd year, was a man of fine physique, and had never, within his own memory, required the services of a doctor, though on two previous occasions at considerable intervals he had had slight seizures.
Deceased was for some years station master at St. Thomas's Station, Exeter, prior to which he was for many years booking clerk at St. David’s. He retired from his position at St. Thomas just over twelve years ago, on attaining the age of 60.
Western Times - Monday 15 May 1922

EXETER PORT. RAT-FREE VESSELS. ISOLATION OF DISEASES.

At a meeting of the Exeter Port Sanitary Authority presided over Mr. J. Stokes, the Sanitary Inspector (Mr. A. E. Bonham) reported that during the quarter ended March 31st he had inspected the crews and cargoes of six vessels. All the members of the crews appeared to be in good health, and there were no signs of rats aboard. He had also made periodical inspections of wharves and warehouses and their condition was satisfactory.
The Medical-officer Health (Dr. Beesly) reported that during the quarter there were no cases of infectious disease in the port. Only one vessel—it belonged Belgium— was reported dirty, and the cause for complaint was promptly remedied. Thirteen vessels entered the port, the total tonnage being 1,217. He did not find any rats on the vessels. The mussel cleansing works were proceeding satisfactorily.
In his annual report Dr. Beesly stated there had been a decrease in foreign vessels entering the port, the number being 22. against 30 the previous year, and an increase in coastwise vessels, 114, against 63 in 1920. No cases of illness on shipboard, either infectious or otherwise, were reported. The provision of a satisfactory place for reception of cases of plague or cholera which might arrive in the port was engaging the attention of the Authority, the hospital ship being quite unsuitable for the purpose. It was hoped a solution of the difficulty would be speedily found.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Saturday 13 May 1922

EXETER HIPPODROME NEXT WEEK'S ATTRACTIONS.

An attractive bill has been arranged for Exeter Hippodrome next week. The star turn will be a sketch entitled "The Disorderly Room," by Eric Blore. The act— a skit on an Army institution—is presented by Messrs. Tom Walls arid Leslie Henson Ltd., and is reputed to be one the most laughable farces on the halls. Tommy Handley and Harry Buss are the comedians of the show, which should attract crowded houses. The other turns will be Ethel Castaldine, soprano, in selections from her repertoire: De Alma the monarch of the banjo; Violet Gwynne and Derek Vane, in “East and West,” a harmony of music and colour; Paul Thomson, in a Vaudeville. “pick-me-up;" and Lala and Newton, in a comedy wire act. There will be pictures on the bioscope.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Saturday 27 May 1922

EXETER AS A TOURIST CENTRE - Work of the Official Information Bureau

"Everything possible, as far as our limited income allow, is being done to make the city better known as a tourist centre and place of great historical interest."
Thus report the Committee the Exeter Official Information Bureau, their eleventh annual statement to be presented at the annual meeting of subscribers on Tuesday morning next, at the Bureau, in Queen-street. The financial statement for the year shows a balance in hand of £95 1s 6d. There were 92 subscribers. The receipts for the year, which totalled £397 7s 4d, included a subsidy of £100 from the Royal Automobile Club, whose Western office is at the Information Bureau.
The Committee add that the Bureau, by its propaganda of advertising pictorial posters and distribution of illustrated guides, continues to attract visitors to Exeter in increasing numbers, and they much appreciate the existence of such an institution.
Western Times - Friday 12 May 1922

THE HERO'S HOME.

Exeter City Bench had a difficult housing case before them yesterday. Samuel Davis, 8, Townsend's court, Sidwell Street, applied for possession of 132 Cowlck Street, occupied by Albert John Morrish, a City Council employee.
Mr. M. J. McGahey, who appeared for the applicant, remarked that a prominent statesman talked about home fit for heroes to live in, but his client served in France for four years and the home fit for that hero to live in was two rooms—a kitchen and one bedroom, which had to be partitioned in order that a niece of 20 should have sleeping accommodation. A quantity of surplus furniture was also stored in the room. The Cowick Street house was bought by the applicant eight months ago for his own occupation, but the defendant or his wife had repeatedly stated that they would not take a house out of St Thomas. If Davis could have the kitchen and one bedroom, with the joint use of the scullery, he would be satisfied.
Evidence was given by the applicant and his wife. ln cross-examination, Davis admitted that he intended taking his niece to Cowick Street, and one bedroom would not be sufficient. He suggested that the married daughter and her child who lived with the defendant should go elsewhere.
Mr. S. Ernest Crease, appearing for the defendant, submitted that the house was not structurally adapted for division. Even the married daughter and child left, the defendant would require the tame sleeping accommodation for his family, because at present another daughter slept in the same room as the married one. The attic was unfit to be used as a bedroom. After a long consultation, the Chairman Mr. A. C. Roper said the case was a difficult and extremely unsatisfactory one to arrive at conclusion about. The magistrates decided that the case would be adjourned for seven weeks.
Western Times - Wednesday 24 May 1922

RELIEF AT EXETER. DEARTH OF APPLICATIONS

A remarkable feature in regard to the alleged need for Poor Law assistance for the relief of poverty at Exeter is the dearth of applications to the relieving officers. Complaint has been made that the existing staff has been insufficient to deal with them. The fact is that the staff would have been capable of dealing with a much larger number, but they have not been forthcoming.
Official figures show that between March 28th, when the deputation from the Unemployment Association appeared before the Board, and May 20th, not more than 71 individuals applied for assistance. Last Tuesday a crowd of rather over 100, in response to a request, made by sandwich board notices sent out by the Association, assembled at the Board's offices. To the onlooker their presence would naturally give rise to the belief that there would have been a big rush of applications. Up to this morning, however, there were only five received. In accordance ' with powers given him, the Relieving Officer granted immediate relief in three necessitous cases.
Western Times - Saturday 27 May 1922

PLUCKY ACT AT EXETER. -

Constable Rescues a Woman Who Jumped Into the River Sunday evening P.C. Hodder was patrolling the Quay, when saw a woman named Bertha Richards, aged about 24 years, of 49, Barnardo Road, Exeter, standing by the water's edge. Immediately she noticed the constable, she gave a groan and exclaimed: "I am gone." She sat down on the edge of the Quay and threw herself into the water. P.C. Hodder at once jumped into a boat nearby, but in endeavouring to catch hold of the woman to rescue her, himself fell into the river. Richards struggled with him, but he managed to seize hold of another boat, and succeeded in getting her to the Quay. Mr. Gregory, boatman, and P.C. Ware came to his assistance, and the woman was taken to the former's home, where first aid was rendered. She was subsequently taken to the R.D. and E. Hospital, where she was seen by Dr. Thompson and detained.
Western Times - Tuesday 02 May 1922

EXETER'S PUBLIC HALL. City Corporation Bill Passed Second Reading

The unopposed Bills Committee of the House Commons yesterday had before them for consideration the Bill promoted by the Exeter Corporation, seeking powers to convert one of the market trades into an assembly hall of public rooms.
Mr. Pritchard. Parliamentary agent, said the public hall in Exeter was destroyed by fire some time ago, and when rebuilt would not be for the same purpose. The matter was complicated financial position of the markets' undertaking. There were in existence two sets mortgages given on the revenue of the market undertaking, £79,927 first mortgage bonds and £20,840 second mortgage bonds. The latter had never had the full interest, and after negotiations the holders had consented to accept £9 10s per cent, in settlement. The holders of the first mortgages would have the security transferred to a mortgage the rates, and a sinking fund would be established to wipe out the holding.
After formal evidence by the Town Clerk, the Bill was passed for second reading.
Western Times - Wednesday 31 May 1922

THEFT OF PETROL AND TOOLS AT EXETER

Sentence of a month's imprisonment with hard labour was passed on William McKeowen, a motor driver, at the Exeter City Police Court yesterday.
He was charged with stealing nine petrol tins, a breast drill and two spanners, valued at £3, the property of Thomas Griffin. The magistrates present were Messrs. R. C. Upright (in the chair), P. Kelland and A. C. Roper.
During the past month the defendant was employed for four days on the Quay by Mr. Griffin, who a fortnight ago discovered that the petrol tins and tools were missing. McKeowen was seen at Crediton, where he was employed by the proprietor of a travelling show, and the police found the articles his possession. He stated that he purchased them from a man unknown to him.
Defendant pleaded guilty, and the Chief Constable informed the Bench that in 1911 the man was sent to a reformatory, and the 3rd of the present month he was fined £1 at Crediton for stealing tools.
Western Times - Wednesday 10 May 1922

IN THE SAFE KEEPING OF EXETER. IN THE SAFE KEEPING OF EXETER. The mayor (Mr P. F. Rowsell) receiving on behalf of the City of Exeter, the Croix de Guerre presented by the French Government to the 24th Field Ambulance (1st Wessex).
Western Morning News - Thursday 04 May 1922

 

This month's selection researched and edited by Pete Martin

April 1922

HER GOOD NAME:
STORY OF A MURDER CONFESSION.

Miss F. Parkes. of Carlton Terrace, New North Road, Exeter, who was dressed in nurse’s uniform, asked a King's Bench Divisional Court yesterday to order that a confession of murder should be brought forward so that her good name might be cleared. This confession, she declared, was in the hands of a solicitor.
Miss Parkes said that she was convicted of manslaughter at Exeter Assizes in 1917, and that she had served six months' imprisonment in the Second Division.
She was, she said, fighting for her Devonshire home and the valuable old oak which had been taken away from it. Another person, Miss Parkes added, had confessed to the murder of the baby in respect of whose death she was tried and sentenced, but that confession not brought forward.
The Lord Chief Justice pointed out that if Miss Parkes had a grievance her proper course was to bring an action against the solicitor who was alleged to have wronged her. That Court could not help her.
Westminster Gazette - Saturday 01 April 1922

EFFECT AT EXETER.

Snow fell in Exeter district from 5 a.m, until mid-day. The countryside for many miles, notably towards the Haldon and the outskirts of Dartmoor, presented a beautiful spectacle. The fall caused inconvenience to vehicular traffic, and interfered somewhat with telephonic and telegraphic business, but a thaw set in soon, and by early afternoon Exeter streets showed little trace of snow.
For Exeter the fall was particularly unfortunate. Shopping week was in full swing, and the snow, besides throwing extra work on the staffs, tended to keep away country customers.
Langport & Somerton Herald - Saturday 08 April 1922

EXETER AND NEXT ELECTION.
THREE-CORNERED FIGHT

The question whether Exeter is to have a three-cornered fight at the next Parliamentary election is still undecided. At present Sir Robert Newman. M.P., has an Independent Liberal in the field against him, but whether the Labour Party decide to run a candidate on their own depends upon the result of the inquiries which are to be made by the Executive into the policy of the Party, both as regards Parliamentary and municipal elections.
The annual meeting of the Exeter Labour Party was held at the Druid's Hall. Exeter, last_ evening, but much of the usual annual business was adjourned, the major part the meeting being devoted to discussion on policy. After a full discussion the meeting passed a resolution instructing the Executive Committee to go into the question and to call a meeting of the full members the Party in the near future to decide the Party's policy in view of the probable near approach of a General Election, and also in regard to municipal fights.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Saturday 22 April 1922

EXETER’S UNEMPLOYED,
BOLSHEVIK POSTER SEQUEL.

Mr. C. E Foster (Hon. Secretary) and Mr. W. O'Reilly (Assistant Hon. Secretary) inform us that they have resigned from their official positions with the Exeter Unemployed Association following the display in Tuesday's unemployed procession of a poster bearing the words “Press for recognition of Soviet Russia and so start the wheels industry”. The poster, they declare, came as a surprise to them, and they were unaware of the facts until after the demonstration. Both have all along refused to associate themselves with anything in the nature of a Communistic movement. Through their agency the Association has done good work on constitutional lines. Interviews have been obtained with the Town Clerk of Exeter and the St. Thomas Board of Guardians, and many leading citizens have been approached with a view to the needs of the unemployed being brought before the public. Messrs. Foster and O'Reilly desire to thank all who have shown much sympathy and encouragement, and the proprietors the entertainment houses for displaying slides advertising the Association.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Thursday 06 April 1922

EXETER’S SHOPPING WEEK.
TOMORROW'S ATTRACTIONS.

Wet weather continues to mar the full success Exeter's Shopping Week, although there is no doubt that increased business has come Exeter's way a result of the present effort, while the city is receiving an advertisement which is bound have a lasting effect for good. Mrs. F.Ford released the daily quota of balloons from the Guildhall yesterday, and although the majority made good flights, several came down in the streets to delight of the crowds.
It has been decided to hold the fancy dress and confetti carnival tomorrow evening as originally arranged, but it is requested that all who use confetti will not pick it up from the streets, a proceeding which is very insanitary. Those in fancy dress will assemble at Bedford Circus and headed by a band march to the Guildhall, inside which the Mayor and Mayoress, the Sheriff and Mrs Brock, and Mr. C. J. Ross will adjudicate the prizes, of which a number of valuable ones will be awarded.
In connection with the “number" competition, it may be mentioned that there are still about 900 cut of the 1,000 waiting be claimed. The lucky numbers must be somewhere in the district, for each one is to be found in one or other of the thousands of programmes given away in Exeter or district or on one of the balloons released daily.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Tuesday 04 April 1922

EXETER STOCKBROKER'S AFFAIRS
HEAVY DEFICIENCY.

The public examination in bankruptcy of Leslie Athelstan Warren Ward, who carried on business at 88, Queen-street. Exeter, as a stockbroker, took place before Mr. John E. Daw (Registrar). The net deficiency was returned at £3,473 4s 11d. Causes of failure alleged by debtor were want of capital. Interest on borrowed capital, and losses on the purchase and re-sale of shares. Mr. A. Martin Alford appeared for the debtor, and Mr. Maurice Mathew for Mr. Horsfall, Exeter, the petitioning creditor.
Debtor, examined by the Official Receiver (Mr. Rackwood Cocks), said he had a capital at the start of £40 or £50. He was formerly employed by a firm of commission agents in Queen Street, and prior to that had been assisting his father in a grocery business at Teignmouth. He attributed his losses entirely to Stock Exchange transactions. The whole of the debts had been contracted since July 1920. As a matter of fact, when he got into debt, he could not take up shares bought for clients. He had to buy them subsequently, often at an advanced price. That alone resulted in a total loss to him of £1,400. In addition, he bought shares to cover himself against “an involuntary bear." That also went the wrong way in nearly every instance. If had had capital to control at the proper time, instead of loss, he should have made a profit of £3.000 or £4,000. In nearly every case shares went up subsequent to the purchase. He also lost in connection with underwriting that he took over.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Saturday 08 April 1922

VALUABLE POINTS FOR EXETER

Playing at Exeter in wet weather, yesterday, before only 2,000 spectators, Northampton Town were defeated by Exeter City by two clear goals.
The home men had the advantage of the wind in the first half, but, although they were the better side, they could not score prior to the interval.
Five minutes after change of ends, however, Vowles gave Exeter the lead, and three minutes later Kirk increased his side's advantage.
Exeter had all the best of the play in the second half, but Smith, the Northampton goalkeeper, was in splendid form, and saved finely upon several occasions.
At the other end Graham missed badly when in favourable position, and, later on, Hewison also threw away a good chance.
Just before the finish Lockett, of Northampton, fired in a fine shot, but Fryer brought off a wonderful one-handed save.
The points thus gained are extremely valuable to Exeter, although they are still bottom but one on the Southern Third Division table.
Daily Herald - Tuesday 04 April 1922

EXETER POLICE AND MOTOR. TRAFFIC.

The Chief Constable of Exeter has reported to the Watch Committee with regard to statements made in the Police-court that the number of prosecutions in Exeter against motorists is so excessively high that motorists will be deterred from visiting the city.
These statements (says the Chief-Constable) are absolutely without foundation. During 1921, of the offences reported by the police in which mechanically propelled vehicles were concerned, only 16 per cent, were prosecuted. Exeter has 24 per cent, fewer prosecutions than the average of ten other towns of smaller average size. When it is realised what a large amount law governs the use of mechanically-propelled vehicles, and that in this city some 600,000 of such vehicles pass one point in a year, I think it will be agreed that the number prosecutions are surprisingly small."
The Home Secretary has declined on the ground of expense to allow the engagement for traffic control of men other that policemen.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Saturday 08 April 1922

EXETER PROPERTIES IN THE MARKET.

There was a large attendant the Horse and Groom Hotel, Heavitree, yesterday afternoon, when Messrs. Hussey and Son, Exeter, offered for sale several desirable freehold properties. A corner block cf property, Nos. 65 and 66, Fore-street, Heavitree, having an area of about 8,000 square feet, was withdrawn at £1,200. A freehold shop and dwelling-house, No.1 North Place, North Street, was sold to Mr. J. West, tenant, for £500. Two brick and stone-built and stuccoed and tiled cottages. Nos. 2 and 3, Ellis's Place, Fore Street, bringing in a total rental of 7s 9d per week, were sold to Mr. W. Anning, Heavitree, for £230. A semi-detached dwelling house, brick and stone built, No. 1, Oakfield Street, was sold to the tenant, Mr. F.H. Fry, at £175. Nos. 4, 7, 8, and 10, Oakfield Street, similar houses to the previous lot, and No. 20, Belgrave Road, Paris Street, Exeter, were withdrawn, the bids not reaching the reserve prices, and these houses are now for sale by private treaty. Nos. 3 and 6, Oakfield Street, were sold prior to the auction at satisfactory prices. Messrs. R. T. and H. Campion, Exeter, were the solicitors for the vendors.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Thursday 27 April 1922

OFFENCE AT EXETER.

After his arrest for the present offence, he admitted breaking into a dwelling house at Exeter in October 1920 and stealing a considerable quantity of jewellery and clothing which, he stated, he disposed of to people in Tottenham Court Road. London for sums amounting in the aggregate to nearly £100. Witness produced a warrant for that offence received from the Exeter City Police.
He admitted that in January or February 1920. when serving as a fireman on the S.S. Huntscreen. he stole three blankets when leaving the ship, which he stated, he gave to his wife, but she denied all knowledge of them. He was liberated front Ipswich Prison three days before the commission of the offence with which he was now charged.
Prisoner said that when he got to Plymouth he had no means of support, and his wife “turned hint down." He “could not live on air” and if he begged he would get into trouble. He was unable to obtain employment, and he asked the Recorder to take the Exeter offence into consideration in passing sentence.
“If employment is difficult to obtain there are means of getting some sort of support and keeping away from crime”, said the recorder. He would not send him to penal servitude on that occasion but felt he ought to deal with him pretty severely and passed sentence of 18 months with hard labour.
Western Evening Herald - Saturday 22 April 1922

EXETER'S UNEMPLOYED.
MAYOR'S FUND.

The Exeter unemployed held an open-air demonstration on Saturday evening, when a large number assembled at Buller’s Statue and marched in procession to Bedford Circus where a mass meeting was hold.
Mr. S. Chilcott., who presided, explained the aims and object of the Unemployment Association. Referring to the Mayor’s Fund, he said he thought it would very soon run dry. How were men receiving money from it now going to manage then? The inability of men to carry on with pick and shovel work was brought on solely by lack of sufficient food required by a man to enable him to do a good day’s manual labour.
The Rev. Donald Fraser said the dangerous corners in Exeter and the repair of roads round about, which he considered to be in a disgraceful state, would absorb tremendous number of the unemployed, lit tailed to see why, if £8,000,000 could spent per day on the war to destroy life, a few thousand could not be spent to save life and relieve unemployment.
Mr. C. Foster, the Secretary of the Association, said the Boards of Guardians were sympathetic and only that morning he had received a cheque from a Guardian.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Monday 03 April 1922

EXETER HIPPODROME
NEXT WEEK'S ATTRACTIONS

Exonians will be given the opportunity next week, at the Hippodrome, of seeing the world-famous eccentrics, the Ten Loonies. They are described as the crazy comedy band, and are ten comedians who combine fun with good music. This act, which is presented by Mr. R. J. W. Harris, has had great receptions at every halt visited for the last few years, and is bound to win approval at Exeter. The other turns are all first-class, and include J. H. Scotland, in song, comedy, and dialect: Elsie Sims, a singer of songs Thornbury, the lightning painter and entertainer the Brothers Obo, the popular laughing comedians, in a new burlesque ; and Yoga, who is styled as India's foremost mystic entertainer and who is coming direct from Maskelyne's Theatre of Mystery London, in addition to these turns the film of the Football Association Cup final will be screened throughout the week.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Saturday 29 April 1922

AN EXETER HERO
Rescue from Drowning in the Exe Last Evening

A gallant rescue from drowning was witnessed at Exeter last evening. Albert Wiliiam Page, five and a half years of age, of 3, Clifton Street, fell into the river while-playing on the bank near Gervase Avenue. James Henry Laskey, of 26, Friernhay Street, who was in the neighbourhood, immediately ran to the spot and jumped into the river, which was in flood. The current at this spot was very strong, but Laskey succeeded in getting Page safely to the bank, with the assistance of Henry Godbeer, of Grendon Buildings. P.C. W. E. Parker rendered first aid, and removed the boy to the Star and Garter Inn, where Mrs. Pratt, wrapped him in blankets and the officer took him home.
Western Times - Tuesday 18 April 1922

MINOR ACCIDENTS AT EXETER

There were several minor accidents in Exeter during the weekend. Albert J. Bryant, of 20. Portland Street was riding motorcycle and sidecar in High Street, when a lad stepped from behind a vehicle. In order avoid him, Bryant turned to the left, and in doing so he collided with a cyclist named John Hutchings, 49, Paris Street, who was thrown from his machine. However, neither person was injured.
On Saturday afternoon, Robert Ebenezer Richardson, of Pinhoe Road was proceeding down High Street, in a motor car, when, near Broadgate, he collided with another car, driven by D. F. W. Baden Powell, of Oxford, who was emerging from Broadgate. Both motors were slightly damaged.
On Saturday evening, Frederick Watts, aged 27, of 14 Manston Road, was standing on the table in the Gymnasium of the Y.M.C.A. for the purpose of lighting the gas and, in attempting to get down, his foot caught in the table, and he fell to the floor, sustaining a fractured wrist.
Western Times - Tuesday 11 April 1922

BUS COLLIDES WITH TRAM IN EXETER HIGH STREET

The fore part of tram No.18, which was proceeding up High Street, Exeter, towards the Guildhall, sustained considerable damage yesterday in collision with an Okehampton to Exeter D.M.T. 'bus, which was proceeding in the same direction.
The collision took place just opposite St. Petrock's Church, and was caused apparently by an error judgment on the part of the 'bus driver, who in attempting to pass the tram on the right side took too sharp a curve in swerving round into line with the up-street traffic, with the result that, the rear the 'bus struck the right side fore part of the tram with such force that the front rod supporting the driver's platform was buckled and the dash plate torn off. The vehicle, however, kept to the rails, and was able to proceed later the depot.
Western Times - Tuesday 11 April 1922

DANGEROUS SPEED AT EXETER

At Exeter Police-court, before Messrs. E. C. Perry (in the chair), J. Stocker, J. D. Harris, and P. C. M. Veitch, yesterday, William Edward Hagger, 31, Cambridge Avenue, Kilburn, N.W.6, was summoned for driving motor car Heavitree Road at a speed dangerous to the public on April 7th. George Hart, of Heavitree, said defendant’s car passed him at Liverydole, proceeding in the direction of Heavitree, at estimated speed of 35 miles per hour. Mrs. I. Hart, wife the last witness, corroborated. Sub-Inspector Snell said he was entering Heavitree Road from Polsloe Road when the car passed at a dangerous rate. He held up his hand, and shouted, "Steady! Steady!” but no notice was taken. Defendant, giving evidence, said was not driving 35 miles an hour. He was unaware the corner was dangerous, or he would have slowed up. He did not see a warning notice. Cross-examined by the Chief-Constable: might have been going 25 miles per hour, seeing the road was clear. Mr. P. Steward, defendant's employer, who was in the car, said they were not travelling at a high speed. Mr. H. T. Michelmore, for defendant, said he was ignorant of the district, and the warning sign not in as prominent a position as it might be. The Bench imposed a fine £3 and costs.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Saturday 29 April 1922

EXETER TRADERS AND SHOPPING WEEK. SHOPPING WEEK Yesterday's parade of Exeter traders' decorated vehicles and tableaux, one of the most attractive features of a highly successful shopping week.
Western Morning News - Thursday 06 April 1922

 

This month's selection researched and edited by Pete Martin

March 1922

EXETER DEAN AND "GIPSY" SMITH.

The Dean of Exeter Cathedral, after consulting with the Chapter, refused to accede to a request by deputation of Free Churchmen that the Cathedral should be placed at the disposal of Captain "Gipsy" Smith, the revivalist, whose preaching has drawn audiences of thousands every day. The Dean's decision has aroused an acute controversy particularly, deputation urged that consent would cement good feeling between Orthodoxy and Dissent. Dean Gamble, discussing the matter, said: —" Mr Gipsy Smith recently desired to preach in Exeter Cathedral, and afterwards the rector of the local Roman Catholic Church, proposed that he should say Mass in the Cathedral. Is the Cathedral to be lent to one and not to another? Is every wandering evangelist to claim right to preach there? Are Methodists to admitted and Roman Catholics excluded? Are Baptists to be welcomed and Unitarians refused? What about Christian Scientists, Spiritualists, and Positivists? As things are the great mass of church people would deeply resent the Cathedral being used in this fashion, and as Dean of Exeter I decline now, or in the future, to burn my fingers by sanctioning it. It must go to higher authority.”
Dundee Evening Telegraph - Monday 06 March 1922

EXETER AND PUBLIC HALL - PROMOTING THE BILL.

A special meeting of the Exeter City Council will be held on April 3rd for the consideration of resolutions dealing with the proposal to Bill Parliament for the acquisition of the Higher Market. Exeter, for the use of a public hall, and, if deemed expedient, for offices, etc. chief resolution worded follows: (1) To empower the Corporation appropriate and use the Higher Market, Exeter, for the purposes of a public hall and, deemed expedient, for Municipal offices, and for such other purposes as may he determined by the Corporation, and enable them to make such alterations therein and additions thereto as may be necessary. (2) To provide for a cancellation of the mortgages issued by the Corporation and charged upon the revenue the markets and for the issue of other securities or the payment of money in lieu thereof. (3) To confer all necessary powers upon the Corporation incidental to the matters aforesaid, including powers with reference to the letting and use of the public hall, the borrowing of money, and other matters; and such other object and purposes as may be determined by the Council. Also, that all expenses in relation to the promotion of the said Bill be charged on the borough fund and borough rate and district fund and general district rate, or any of them, or on such other fund or rate under the control of the Council as the Council should deem advisable."
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Saturday 25 March 1922

EXETER’S GREAT OFFENSIVE STARTS TO-DAY.

The discharge rockets in various parts of Exeter and fanfares of trumpets shortly after 11 o'clock this morning will be tokens that there has started what promises to be one of the most successful events held in the city….a Shopping Week. St. Sidwell’s traders have, in the past, held shopping weeks their district, but this is the first time the “Ever Faithful" as a whole has arranged one. The plan of campaign has been carefully prepared, and the city goes into action to-day fully equipped to maintain and consolidate her position as “the" shopping centre of the West.
If anyone within a radius of 25 miles of the city is unaware of Exeter's intensive business operations, that person must be a marvel, for everything has been done to advertise the event. It may be mentioned, for instance, that 60,000 programmes have been distributed, and the towns, villages, and hamlets have received their share, while other means have been adopted to interest the whole of the countryside. Special excursion tickets are being issued by the G.W.R. Company, the L. and S.W.R. Company has arranged, for market tickets and other facilities, while the various motor 'bus and char-a-banc companies have agreed to run special services between the city and places in a wide area around.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Thursday 30 March 1922

EXETER FATHER'S NEGLECT.

At Exeter Police-court, before. Messrs. H. B. Varwell (in the chair)), T. W. Ainge, and P. Kelland, yesterday, Charles Fred Tootell 23, Easton’s Buildings, Castle Street, was Summoned for neglecting his child during the past three months in a manner likely to cause it unnecessary suffering. The Chief-Constable stated that defendant was not in regular employment but drew pay at the rate of 21s per week when out of work. He drank heavily, and his wife and child had to go short of food and clothing. The rent of the house was 2s 6d. but none had been paid for fifteen weeks. Defendant's wife's mother gave the child (aged 14 months food occasionally. The wife received pint milk a day from the Babies' Welfare Centre, and had pawned many things to buy food and clothing. Defendant’s wife, her mother, and Miss Mercer (police-officer) gave evidence in support of this statement. Defendant was sentenced to a month's hard labour, but not to be enforced if he maintained his child.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Thursday 02 March 1922

EXETER BLANKET SOCIETY. CHECKING ABUSE OF CHARITY.

There were general congratulations at the annual meeting of the Exeter Blanket Society, held at 51, Magdalen Street, Exeter, yesterday, that the revised arrangements for the issue of blankets had resulted in the articles finding their way into homes where they were urgently needed.
The annual report stated that 1,005 blankets were distributed last autumn, and that on December 31st the stock blankets the depot was 910, 686 of which were good condition and 225 patched and thin. The Committee gave 100 blankets to the Mayor's Unemployment Fund Committee for necessitous cases, ten to the Exeter District Nursing Association, and ten to the Infant Welfare Centre in Magdalen Streel for the use of poor mothers attending the Centre. The balance-sheet showed £81 19s 4d in hand. The Rev. T. Young, in moving the adoption of the report and balance-sheet, said that, as a newcomer, he valued very highly the work of the Society, which was a tremendous help to him in his parish. He was interested in the statement of steps being taken to ensure more care in the distribution of blankets, because some people had been getting blankets who, he knew, were in prosperous circumstances.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Thursday 09 March 1922

MOTOR SMASH AT EXETER.

A motor smash occurred at the corner of Southernhay, Exeter. A Ford car belonging to Mr. T. W. Bragg, of Countess Wear, was proceeding from Longbrook Street into Southernhay, and failed to take the turn cleanly. It mounted the pavement add dashed into Holman and Ham's chemist shop. A man named James Hallett, of Hele Payne Farm, Hele, was knocked through the window, and received several cuts. He proceeded to the hospital for treatment. The car, the front of which was much damaged, was removed to Gould Bros.' garage close by. It is understood that in turning the corner the driver, who was trying to stop the car to avoid two women, accidentally opened the throttle, so that the car suddenly jumped forward.
South Gloucestershire Gazette - Saturday 04 March 1922

EXETER WHISKY Proved Too Strong for the Ex- Bluejacket

A bluejacket named William Nelson Miles, who had obtained a free discharge from the Navy, and was on his way to Bampton, his home, to take up civilian employment., yesterday broke his journey at Exeter and with a few pals and celebrated the event.
Still attired in sailor's uniform, which he had not had time to change for civilian dress, he appeared at the Exeter Police Court yesterday, to answer a charge of having been drunk and disorderly in High Street last night. According to the evidence P.S. Elford, defendant was seen molesting people. He threw himself down in the middle of the road, and when lifted up by his companions refused to go away and used bad language. With the assistance of P.C. Russell, the sergeant took defendant to the Police Station.
Defendant told the Bench that with his pals he had a few tots of rum and also some whisky. The mixture did not agree with him.
“Was the Exeter beer too strong for you?" asked Mr. Campion, chairman of the Bench. “No, it was the whisky, sir," replied the defendant. The Chairman: Pay a fine of 2s 6d and don't make such a fool of yourself again.

EXETER BLAZE

The smoke respirator was used with great effect in locating a fire which broke out in the basement at the showroom and offices of Messrs. A. Squires, Ltd., wholesale and export brush manufacturers, South Street, Exeter, yesterday. Smoke was observed about 11 o'clock issuing from the basement in which brooms, brushes, and brush handles were stored.
The Exeter Fire Brigade were summoned by telephone and arrived in charge of Supt. Pett with commendable promptitude.
By this time the smoke rising from the basement to the offices and the upper rooms had become so dense as to alarm the staff, as well as the occupants the adjoining property, and the wind carried the columns of smoke up the street in such volumes as to make it at one time impossible to see any distance.
Meanwhile Mr. T. Welch and others assisted the staff to carry out the safe, office books and documents to a place of security.
The fire fighters had a difficult task to locate the fire. A fireman tried to enter the basement from the side entrance but had to retire owing to the smoke and heat. Fireman Wreford went into the basement without a respirator but was so overcome by the fumes that had to be taken out. The damage is estimated at between £400 and £500.
Western Times - Saturday 18 March 1922

EXETER YOUTHS’ STARTLING DISCOVERY. BABY IN A PARCEL.

Two Exeter youths while walking along Duck's Marsh on the Topsham Road, Exeter, saw two girls throw a parcel in the water and then walk away. The youths, in all probability curious about its contents, followed the parcel for a short distance, when they succeeded in recovering it. On examination they found that it contained the body of a newly-born male child. The police were informed, and the body was removed to the mortuary. The elder of the girls was described as from 19 to 20 years of age, 5ft. 4in. in height, stout build, red-faced, and wearing a light grey coat and scarf. Her companion appears to about 16 years, slight build, 5ft. in height, with fair hair hanging down back, and dressed in a navy-blue coat and skirt.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Monday 13 March 1922

EXETER'S UNEMPLOYED. WORK AND RELIEF.

A largely attended meeting of unemployed under the auspices of the local branch the Unemployed Association was held in Exeter yesterday. It was agreed to write to the Town Clerk and Guardians in regard to the provision work and the rates of relief to try and form a band among the ranks of the unemployed, and to hold a flag day for the unemployed if permission could be obtained. It was also suggested that the various trades represented should try and get contracts which they could carry out on their own account, and to acquaint land owners and others of the fact that there were many men seeking employment. lt was agreed to hold an open-air demonstration, and the Chairman contended that if the whole of the unemployed attended the people of Exeter would be absolutely staggered at seeing how many people were out of work in the city.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Friday 10 March 1922

ACCIDENTS AT EXETER

Mr. T.H. Curnow, aged 30 years, residing at 53, Ladysmith Road, well known, in local Association football circles, and who is employed at the Devon and Somerset Stores, was unloading barrels of port yesterday afternoon from a L and S.W.R. lorry in High Street, when one of the barrels slipped and pinched his fingers. Mr. Curnow was knocked down and the barrel rolled over his leg. Ex-Constable Hatherley rendered first aid and the injured man was conveyed to the Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, where he was examined by Dr.Thompson, assistant house surgeon, and found to be suffering from a crushed little finger of the right hand and abrasions to the right leg. He was conveyed to his home. Yesterday afternoon Stanley Mortimer, aged 25, of No.8 Cheeke Street, was working on a chimney at back of Mr. Challice's premises, St. Sidwell's, when he fell to the ground, a distance of some 30 feet. First-aid was rendered Sergt. Arnold and P.C. Pitts, and Mortimer was removed to Hospital in the St. John, Ambulance. He was examined by Dr. Thompson, assistant house surgeon, and found to be suffering from an injury to the ribs. He was detained.
Western Times - Saturday 11 March 1922

MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENT AT EXETER

Yesterday, Mr. P.S. Telling, greengrocer, of Paris-street. Exeter, was leaving a garage about mid-day to go down the street on his motor cycle to which was attached a side-car, when the wind seems to have caught the machine, and prevented it from turning. Control being lost, the cycle and side-car dashed into the shop of Mr. M. E Dingle, fruiterer, etc. The large plate-glass window was smashed, and Mr. Telling had one of his hands badly cut, and he was much shaken. At the Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital several stitches had to be inserted in a long deep cut on one his lingers. He was made an out-patient. It is understood that the owner of the smashed window is insured.
Western Times - Thursday 09 March 1922

FOUR IN A ROOM REVELATIONS AT EXETER COUNTY COURT.

A deplorable state of affairs was revealed at Exeter County Court on Tuesday, when Mr. L. D. Thomas applied on behalf of Frederick Thomas Westlake. licensee of the London and South-Western Hotel, Paul Street, Exeter. for the possession of the club-room, occupied by Mrs. Stephens under a tenancy granted previous to his becoming licensee, and to terminate which he had given notice.
Mr. Thomas said the condition of the tenancy was insanitary, and the tenant's conduct amounted to a nuisance and annoyance.
His Honour: It is more. You are liable to be prosecuted.
Mr. Thomas: We are in deadly peril.
He added that the woman, a man, and two small children lived in the room without sanitary accommodation, and their only water supply was from a urinal in the yard.
Defendant, who appeared in court carrying an infant, denied the allegations
His Honour: You must leave this place.
Defendant • I should have gone if I could have got a place.
An order for possession within 21 days was made.
Langport & Somerton Herald - Saturday 11 March 1922

EXETER FOOTBALLER MARRIED

The marriage was solemnised at. St. Mary Major's Church, Exeter, yesterday, of Mr. A. V. Green, a member the Exeter City Football Club, and Miss Winnie Walkev (eldest daughter of Mr. F. J. Walkey). the Old Golden Lion Inn, Exeter. The bride wore a brown costume with hat to match, and Mr. J. Lake acted as best man. Rev. T. Youhg was the officiating clergyman. Among: the many presents were a clock from the- and friends of the Exeter City F.C, silver-plated tea service and spirit kettle from the customers at the Old Golden Lion, and an oak salad bowl from the members of the Exeter Corn Exchange. After the ceremony the happy couple left for Rotherham for the honeymoon. The bridegroom has! rendered splendid service to the Exeter City F.C., and local enthusiasts will wish Mr. and Mrs. Green every success and happiness in their new venture.
Western Times - Monday 27 March 1922

EXETER WOMAN SEVERELY BURNED.

Annie Harvey, 46, married, of Cowick Street, Exeter, was admitted to the Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, suffering from severe burns in the upper part of the body. She was going upstairs, carrying lighted lamp when she fell backwards, the lamp falling her. First aid was rendered First Officer Rivers, St. John Ambulance, Sergt. Arnold, and P.C. Newman. The woman was conveyed to hospital in the motor ambulance.
Western Morning News - Monday 06 March 1922

EXETER SOUP KITCHEN.

For the third time during the season Exeter Soup Kitchen opened yesterday for the distribution of 200 gallons of soup. Although the distribution was not due commence until 12.15, there were many men, women, and children mainly from the poorer parts of the city waiting at 11a.m. The work of preparing the ingredients was again undertaken by Mr. S. Holman-who has been engaged at the Kitchen for something like 32 - years assisted by Mrs. Lipsham. Those helping in the distribution were Mesdames T. Bradley Rowe, Walter Browne, Elton Laing and Stone. Miss Linscott, Messrs. Ernest F. Stone; (Hon. Secretary), W. S. Linscott, Alan Stone. Rogers, and G. G. Ford (Superintendent). Tomorrow there will be another distribution of 300 gallons at noon.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Friday 24 March 1922

PROPOSED PUBLIC HALL FOR EXETER. PROPOSED PUBLIC HALL FOR EXETER.  Exeter Higher Markets, a portion of which it is proposed to convert into a public hall.
Western Morning News - Wednesday 15 March 1922

 

This month's selection researched and edited by Pete Martin

February 1922

BLACK'S SENTENCE.
EXECUTION TO TAKE PLACE AT EXETER.

We understand that the necessary arrangements for appeal against the sentence of death passed on Edward Ernest Black at Bodmin Assize on Thursday are left in the hands of counsel. Should there be no alteration in the sentence, on appeal or petition, the condemned man will be hanged at Exeter after the usual interval of three weeks.
Black arrived at Exeter at 10.15 yesterday morning. He was in charge of warders of the Devon County Constabulary and was taken to the county prison.
A curious situation has arisen with regard to the execution. Owing to the closing of Bodmin Prison it will take place at Exeter, but the arrangements will be made by the Under-Sheriff for Cornwall.
Western Morning News - Saturday 04 February 1922

ELOQUENT EVANGELIST
CROWDS FLOCK TO EXETER THEATRE SERVICE.

The evangelical services conducted by " Gipsy" Pat Smith in Exeter yesterday brought large crowds to the Theatre Royal. In the afternoon Gipsy Pat had a heart-to-heart talk to a crowded congregation., of men and youths on " Some things every fellow should know." Fully an hour before the evening service commenced long queues assembled outside the theatre, and shortly after the doors opened there was not a vacant seat.
People of both sexes and all ages crowded in, and large numbers were unable to gain admittance. The stage was fully occupied, and people were standing in all parts of the theatre, the congregation numbering about 2,000.
For three-quarters an hour Gipsy Pat Smith held the close attention of the assembly, taking as his subject “The Love of God." His address was devoid of anything in the nature of the sensational or emotional, and the audience followed with keen interest Gipsy Pat's experiences in making converts of his old associates.
It was a remarkable meeting, and a testimony to the magnetism and eloquence Gipsy Pat.
Western Morning News - Monday 20 February 1922

EDDISON—DREW, AT EXETER.

Considerable interest was taken in a marriage which took place at St. James' Church, Exeter, yesterday, between Dr. Wilfred B Eddison, only son of Mr. T. Eddison, Weston, Epsom and Miss Dulce Bella Mary Drew, elder daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Drew, of 5 Pennsylvania Park, Exeter. The bride belongs to a well-known Devonshire family, her father being a member of the firm of Messrs. J. and H. Drew, land agents and surveyors, of Southernhay East.
The chancel of the church had been prettily decorated with flowers by the bride's sister, Mrs. G. Robinson and the service was choral, the hymns " The King Love."
“Our God, our help," and “Lord, Thy Word Abideth" being sung. There was a large congregation.
The bride was attired white crepe-de-chine, with a train of cream velvet, and white tulle veil. She carried a bouquet of arum lilies and wore a bunch of orange blossom which was also worn by her grandmother at her wedding. She was attended by Mesdames Guy Robinson, R. D. Ward, C. Wade, and A. Ridgway as bridesmaids, and they wore dresses of mauve and blue and carried sheaves of lilac. Their necklaces were the gifts of the bridegroom. Dr. G.H. Fitzgerald carried out the duties of "best man," and the bride was given away by her father. A reception was afterwards held at Pennsylvania Park. Among the many handsome presents was a silver-mounted salad bowl from the staff of Messrs. J. and H. Drew.
Western Morning News - Wednesday 08 February 1922

EXETER VACCINATION
Third of Parents Granted Certificates of Exemption.

An increase in the number of objections to vaccinations was reported at yesterday's meeting of the Exeter Board of Guardians, Mr J. R. Nethercott presiding .
The numbers for the past year were: Births, 1167; successfully vaccinated, 646; certificates of conscientious objection, 395, died unvaccinated, 59; postponed, 25. The annual report of the Exeter Brabazon Society was submitted by the honorary secretary (Miss Roberts). The report stated that the Society had been working in the Exeter Poor Law institution for 27 years. During the past 12 months, two male and seven female inmates had been employed addition to the elder schoolgirls. The annual sale realised £11 11s 3d. On the year's working there was a balance of £25 19s 5½ d. Owing to the large increase of casual Paupers, the Devonshire Vagrancy Committee wrote asking for a further contribution £35 from the Guardians. It was agreed to make the contribution and approve the continuance of the way-ticket and pooling system.
Western Times - Wednesday 15 February 1922

EXETER ACCIDENTS

John Symonds, aged 7, -residing at 37 Regents Square, Heavitree, Exeter, received several abrasions the face as a result of being knocked down by a tram-car while running across Fore Street, Heavitree, on Saturday.
As a motor car, driven Herbert James Watts, of Woodhouse, Chudeigh, was passing along Fore Street, Exeter, towards Exe Bridge, on Saturday, Olive Came, four years of age, of 19, Exe Street, ran across the road in front the car and was knocked down. P.C. Harris ran to the child’s assistance carried her to the premises of Mr. Lendon’s. She was afterwards conveyed to the Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital in the St. Ambulance. Dr. Thompson, assistant house surgeon, was unable to find any injury. The girl was, however, suffering from shock and detained for observation.
Western Times – Monday 13 February 1922

EXETER FAILURE. Affairs of a Dental Operator and Mechanic.

The first meeting of the creditors of Arthur Blake Glendinning, dental operator and mechanic, was held at the office of the Exeter Official Receiver Saturday.
A summary of debtor's affairs disclosed liabilities expected to rank at £178 19s 6d, and assets estimated to produce £28 4s 3d.
“Insufficiency of capital, falling off in practice, and my own bad health during the past four years," were the causes of failure alleged the debtor.
In a deficiency account dating from 21st January 1921, filed by debtor, the household and personal expenses of self, wife, two daughters and servant were entered at £338. His total expenses were placed at £400 15s 3d, and his net trading profit at £250, leaving a deficiency of £150 15s 3d.
Debtor's public examination was fixed for Thursday, 16th inst., the Castle of Exeter.
Western Times - Monday 06 February 1922

EXETER HEALTH
The Lowest Death Rate on Record
SOME OF THE CAUSES

In the course of sixty-three pages, Mr. P. H. Stirk, Exeter's Medical Officer of Health, gives a mass of valuable information relative to the vital statistics and the sanitary work of the city during the past year.
It is, he writes, the record a healthy year, showing the lowest death-rate on record, a low number of deaths from tuberculosis, and the infant mortality rate compares most favourably with former years.
We have a density of population of 49 per acre. The population is estimated at 62,332. The birth-rate for 1920 was 22.46, or 3.74 below that of the 96 large towns in which Exeter is classed. At the same time, it is the highest birth-rate recorded during the past ten years.
The corrected death-rate for 1920 for was 10.91.
The infantile mortality rate was 67.14, which compares very favourably with the rest of the country. The rate for England and Wales is 80.
Mr. Stirk attributes the improvement in Exeter to several causes, i.e., improved sanitary conditions, encouragement of breast feeding, and the educational methods and advice given at the Infant Welfare centres, combined with the provision of extra nourishment in necessitous cases.
The infantile mortality rate among the illegitimate was double that of the legitimate. The Medical Officer's report embodies a statement by the Chief Inspector of Nuisances. A tabulated list of nuisances shows that much housing work was done. No fewer than 1920 houses and premises were inspected.
Western Times - Friday 17 February 1922

EXETER HOSPITAL

The annual meeting of the Ladies' Linen League in connection with the Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital was held on Friday afternoon, Mrs. Stirling, President of the League, occupying the chair. It was reported by Mrs. Secretan, the hon. secretary, that during the past year, the seventeenth of the existence of the League which was formed by Mrs. Ley for the purpose of supplying bedding, blankets, quilts, etc. for use in the Hospital, there were 29 vice-presidents and 404 associates. They had contributed 1,380 articles during the past year. The surgical department, under Mrs. Frank Harding, had made 1,644 bandages, 17,336 swabs for surgical operations and 15 splints. Miss Westlake had knitted 20 dishcloths from selvedges from the bandage material. This made a total this section of 19,050 articles. A contribution of £5 had also been credited to Linen League account per Mrs. Harding.
Mrs. Secretan having intimated her desire to retire from the Secretaryship owing to failing health, it was proposed that Mrs. Hamilton, and seconded by Miss Heberden, that Miss Edmonds be asked to accept the office. Miss Edmonds was unanimously elected.
The financial statement showed that the balance in hand the January, 1921, .was £23 10s 11d; subscriptions during year amounted to £35 17s 4d, and there had been received by the Matron for sheets and blankets £98 2s 8d, making a credit of £157 10s 11d. The payments in respect of quilts, sheets, etc. were £138 12s 2d, so that the balance in hand was £18 18s 9d.
Western Times - Tuesday 21 February 1922

EXETER BOYS’ ADVENTURE

Three boys belonging to the West Quarter Exeter, were landed at Newton Abbot on Friday by a motor vehicle, coming from the Ashburton district, after an escapade, the exact nature which could not be definitely ascertained. Their story, to which little attention is given by the police, is that on Friday morning they boarded a motor lorry at Exeter and were told by the driver that they could have ride to Plymouth and back. Some miles this side of Plymouth, the driver informed the boys he was not returning to Exeter, and that he would have to drop them and leave them to their own resources. They found their way to Ashburton and were then brought to Newton as stated, handed over to the police, and accommodated for the night in the Newton Abbot workhouse.
Western Times - Monday 06 February 1922

BRAILLE DEMONSTRATION AT EXETER

At Exeter University College Tuesday evening an interesting lecture on teaching the blind by the Braille system was given by Mr A. J. Pinn, superintendent of the West of England Blind Institution, who also conducted demonstrations. The Rev. H. S. Marshall presided and referred to the good work which was being done at the Blind Institution at Exeter.
In the course of his lecture, Mr. Pinn said that a good deal of Braille could be written faster than ordinary writing.
A demonstration of reading and writing in the system given the boys and girls from the Exeter Institution was loudly applauded by the large audience present.
Western Times - Thursday 16 February 1922

UNEMPLOYED MEETING AT EXETER

A meeting of unemployed in Exeter was convened at the Franklin Hall, Exeter on Friday, for the purpose of taking opinion as to whether a branch of the Unemployed Association should be formed. The meeting was organised by Mr. C. Lucy and it was decided to co-operate with the organisation. Speeches in favour the propaganda work were delivered.
The chairman, Mr. Chilcott, organiser of the Transport Union, said the unemployed should take action together that they might bring pressure on the people who were denying them the right to live, and he felt confident they would succeed. In the past anything that had been done for the benefit of civilisation had been attended with strenuous work, and, to-day, if they were to get their rights, they must make a fight for what was their own. He advocated that until the whole of the unemployed were found employment, a six-hour day should take the place of the standard eight-hour day by those in work.
Mr. C Lucy, in describing the objects of the Association, said in Exeter there was a Mayor's Fund, and although he did not think they could go in and rob the Fund, there should be a representative present, so that he could go back and tell them what amount was there, and what was being done with it. It was given for their benefit, and not for the benefit of the mayor, to dole it out as he thought fit.
Western Times - Monday 06 February 1922

USEFULNESS OF EXETER SOUP KITCHEN

About two hundred children with jugs and pitchers of various dimensions formed a long queue in Exeter Lower Market on Saturday, awaiting the opening of the Soup Kitchen. Inside the Kitchen four boilers were steaming with 300 gallons of soup. Among the ladies and gentlemen who assisted in the distribution were the Mayor and Mayoress Councillor W. S. and Mrs. Linscott. Mrs. T. Bradley Rowe, Mrs. Elton Laing, Mrs. Parnell Lang, and Mrs. Stone.
Western Times - Monday 20 February 1922

MISSING EXETER GIRL
Rumours That Only Cause Distress

The continued absence of any news concerning the disappearance of Miss E. M. Hallett, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Hallett of the Rougemont Hotel, Exeter, which occurred on January 20th last, has given rise to rumours which in themselves are cruel and without foundation. These are to the effect that Mr. and Mrs. Hallett and the police know the whereabouts of the young lady, and for certain reasons do not wish their knowledge to become public property. Such baseless statements have caused the parents much unnecessary distress and have driven the mother to distraction.
In order to refute these canards, the Chief Constable (Mr. A. F. Nicholson) has asked us to publish the facts that Mr. and Mrs. were married in Dublin in 1904, and that Hiss Hallett was born at Llandudno in 1906. The parents or the police have not the slightest idea to where the girl is, and the offer of £100 for information which will lead to her discovery - still holds good. Every possible inquiry has been made by the police not only in Exeter but all over the country. There is not a police force in England which has not received a minute description of Miss Hallett and special inquiries have been made in Plymouth, Bristol, and Bath.
The statement that the Mormons are concerned in the disappearance has been thoroughly investigated, but there nothing whatever to show that such is the case.
Western Times - Saturday 18 February 1922

LOCAL POLICE STATISTICS

There are interesting points the annual report of the Chief Constable of Exeter. The total strength the Police Force is 72 men and two women. The total amount received during the year the Force for special duty theatres and concerts, etc., was £128 10s 5d. The number of crimes committed daring j the year was 162. Value of property stolen or obtained by fraud; £632 10s 11d, and the amount recovered £355 19s 6d. Of the 104 proceeded against for indictable offences, 31 were juveniles. Of the 126 crimes reported during the year, 126 were detected. Number of people proceeded against for non-indictable offences, 534. Of the 449 persons convicted, 432 were fined, 15 committed to prison, and 2 ordered to enter into recognizance.
The number of persons proceeded against shows a decrease 48, accounted for almost wholly under the head drunkenness.
The city has 172 houses licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquors. 70 persons were proceeded against for drunkenness, a decrease of 47, i.e., 26 during the eight months prior to the “permitted hours" being restricted and 21 during the four months after the restriction.
Accidents resulting in death or personal injury caused by vehicles during the year was 155. In 1920 the number was 153, which | showed an increase of 31 per cent on 1919. Last year of the accidents were among children, and one was killed.
Western Times - Tuesday 14 February 1922

EXETER THEATRE ROYAL.
MAID OF THE MOUNTAINS

If ever a musical comedy was endowed with all the virtues which make for an evening of sheer delight it surely is "The Maid of the Mountains," which Macdonald and Young are presenting at the Theatre Royal, Exeter, next week. The romantic story, with its deep love interest, is laid in strongly contrasted atmospheres, though, rich as they are in every instance, the colour scheme is always chaste and correct. But the factor which more than anything else contributes towards maintaining a perfect atmosphere is Fraser Simson’s work, if such delightfully flowing and graceful music can be described as work. But "The Maid of the Mountains" is far more than a feat for the eye and ear - it is an entertainment all the time, and entertainment in its highest form. What could stir our pulses deeper than Teresa's splendidly loyal devotion to Baldasarre and his brigand band in their misfortunes! What could tickle our domestic consciences more intimately and agreeably than the comic duet, “Husband and Wives" while, as a blend of the tragic and comic, the scene “Dirty Work”, with its startling and novel "effects off," makes us quake and shake with laughter. Thus, “The Maid of the Mountains" appeals all our senses. For the presentation of this delectable dish Macdonald and Young are sending us a company of all round excellence. Vera Macdonald’s rich voice will be heard to advantage the title role, while the dashing Baldasarre, Ernest Shannon, will cut a dramatic figure.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Saturday 11 February 1922

EXETER SCHOOL CHILDREN.
MEDICAL - OFFICER'S' REPORT

Exeter's School Medical officer (Dr. P. H. Stirk), in his report for 1920, states that out of the 8,638 children examined by the school nurses, 182 were found unclean. Of these 176 were treated satisfactorily by parents, and six at the cleansing station. Thirty-eight cases of tuberculosis were referred to the Tuberculosis Dispensary. At the school clinic, 171 cases of ringworm were treated, 29 were still under treatment at end of year, and 142 were cured. The number of visits paid to the clinic for treatment for this disease wore 3,401. The clinic also dealt with and cured 591 cases of impetigo, 5,535 attendances being made. In regard to scabies, 149 children were excluded from school; 85 cases were privately treated and 64 attended the clinic. Sixty cases were cured privately and 58 at the clinic. Seven parents attended the clinic for treatment. During the summer 210 boys and 103 girls qualified tor swimming certificates. At the medical inspection, parents were invited to be present, and generally about 75 per cent of the children had parents with them. Hele's School, having become a provided school, the pupils were medically inspected for the first time. The results showed that, while a rather large number of pupils were suffering from defects, the great majority were of a minor character.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Monday 27 February 1922

EXETER FIRE

The Exeter Fire Brigade were called at about 9.30pm on Saturday night, to 9, King Street, Exeter, used by Messrs. W.Brock and Co. in connection with their cabinet works. It appears that some hot cinders were put into a large tea chest used as a dustbin. The chest caught fire and the latter spread to stoke house partition. Fortunately, the outbreak was extinguished by the police and neighbours before it had chance to spread to the factory and motor garage. As a precautionary measure, Supt. Pett examined the building when the Brigade arrived.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Monday 27 February 1922

AN EXETER SQUABBLE

Mrs. Squires, aged 28, of York Place, Coombe Street, was summoned at Exeter Police Court, Saturday, for assaulting Mrs. Bond, aged 50, landlady of the Duke of York Inn, Coombe Street the15th inst. —Mr. McGahey. who appeared for the complainant, explained that she did not regard the assault as a serious one, and she would be content to have the defendant bound over. But during the past twelve months she had been subjected to a good deal annoyance from the defendant whose house was in court which adjoined the back of the inn. Defendant had been in the habit of using abusive language. The ill-feeling culminated on Wednesday evening last, when defendant, it was alleged, struck complainant in the chest.
This statement was borne out by complainant and her daughter.
Defendant, in defence, alleged that complainant first assaulted her husband-by call him a "lazy loafer." When defendant appeared, complainant called her a "cock-eyed thing.'' They merely pushed one another. — William John Squire, husband of defendant, denied the statements of the complainant and daughters as to the remarks alleged to have been made by the defendant.
Mr. McGahey: “Do you say their story is untrue and has been made up?”
Witness: “Yes; they always do that, don't they, when they summon people here. Mr. McGahey: “is that what you do?”
Witness: “I have never summoned anybody here”.
The Bench bound defendant over in her own recognisances the sum of 10s to be of good behaviour for twelve months.
Western Times - Monday 20 February 1922

EXETER'S WEDDING GIFT. EXETER'S WEDDING GIFT. This exquisite piece of Honiton lace is the wedding present of the City of Exeter to Princess Mary (photos: Heath and Bradnee, Exeter.)
Western Morning News - Friday 24 February 1922

 

This month's selection researched and edited by Pete Martin

HER GOOD NAME:
STORY OF A MURDER CONFESSION.

Miss F. Parkes. of Carlton Terrace, New North Road, Exeter, who was dressed in nurse’s uniform, asked a King's Bench Divisional Court yesterday to order that a confession of murder should be brought forward so that her good name might be cleared. This confession, she declared, was in the hands of a solicitor.
Miss Parkes said that she was convicted of manslaughter at Exeter Assizes in 1917, and that she had served six months' imprisonment in the Second Division.
She was, she said, fighting for her Devonshire home and the valuable old oak which had been taken away from it. Another person, Miss Parkes added, had confessed to the murder of the baby in respect of whose death she was tried and sentenced, but that confession not brought forward.
The Lord Chief Justice pointed out that if Miss Parkes had a grievance her proper course was to bring an action against the solicitor who was alleged to have wronged her. That Court could not help her.
Westminster Gazette - Saturday 01 April 1922

EFFECT AT EXETER.

Snow fell in Exeter district from 5 a.m, until mid-day. The countryside for many miles, notably towards the Haldon and the outskirts of Dartmoor, presented a beautiful spectacle. The fall caused inconvenience to vehicular traffic, and interfered somewhat with telephonic and telegraphic business, but a thaw set in soon, and by early afternoon Exeter streets showed little trace of snow.
For Exeter the fall was particularly unfortunate. Shopping week was in full swing, and the snow, besides throwing extra work on the staffs, tended to keep away country customers.
Langport & Somerton Herald - Saturday 08 April 1922

EXETER AND NEXT ELECTION.
THREE-CORNERED FIGHT

The question whether Exeter is to have a three-cornered fight at the next Parliamentary election is still undecided. At present Sir Robert Newman. M.P., has an Independent Liberal in the field against him, but whether the Labour Party decide to run a candidate on their own depends upon the result of the inquiries which are to be made by the Executive into the policy of the Party, both as regards Parliamentary and municipal elections.
The annual meeting of the Exeter Labour Party was held at the Druid's Hall. Exeter, last_ evening, but much of the usual annual business was adjourned, the major part the meeting being devoted to discussion on policy. After a full discussion the meeting passed a resolution instructing the Executive Committee to go into the question and to call a meeting of the full members the Party in the near future to decide the Party's policy in view of the probable near approach of a General Election, and also in regard to municipal fights.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Saturday 22 April 1922

EXETER’S UNEMPLOYED,
BOLSHEVIK POSTER SEQUEL.

Mr. C. E Foster (Hon. Secretary) and Mr. W. O'Reilly (Assistant Hon. Secretary) inform us that they have resigned from their official positions with the Exeter Unemployed Association following the display in Tuesday's unemployed procession of a poster bearing the words “Press for recognition of Soviet Russia and so start the wheels industry”. The poster, they declare, came as a surprise to them, and they were unaware of the facts until after the demonstration. Both have all along refused to associate themselves with anything in the nature of a Communistic movement. Through their agency the Association has done good work on constitutional lines. Interviews have been obtained with the Town Clerk of Exeter and the St. Thomas Board of Guardians, and many leading citizens have been approached with a view to the needs of the unemployed being brought before the public. Messrs. Foster and O'Reilly desire to thank all who have shown much sympathy and encouragement, and the proprietors the entertainment houses for displaying slides advertising the Association.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Thursday 06 April 1922

EXETER’S SHOPPING WEEK.
TOMORROW'S ATTRACTIONS.

Wet weather continues to mar the full success Exeter's Shopping Week, although there is no doubt that increased business has come Exeter's way a result of the present effort, while the city is receiving an advertisement which is bound have a lasting effect for good. Mrs. F.Ford released the daily quota of balloons from the Guildhall yesterday, and although the majority made good flights, several came down in the streets to delight of the crowds.
It has been decided to hold the fancy dress and confetti carnival tomorrow evening as originally arranged, but it is requested that all who use confetti will not pick it up from the streets, a proceeding which is very insanitary. Those in fancy dress will assemble at Bedford Circus and headed by a band march to the Guildhall, inside which the Mayor and Mayoress, the Sheriff and Mrs Brock, and Mr. C. J. Ross will adjudicate the prizes, of which a number of valuable ones will be awarded.
In connection with the “number" competition, it may be mentioned that there are still about 900 cut of the 1,000 waiting be claimed. The lucky numbers must be somewhere in the district, for each one is to be found in one or other of the thousands of programmes given away in Exeter or district or on one of the balloons released daily.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Tuesday 04 April 1922

EXETER STOCKBROKER'S AFFAIRS
HEAVY DEFICIENCY.

The public examination in bankruptcy of Leslie Athelstan Warren Ward, who carried on business at 88, Queen-street. Exeter, as a stockbroker, took place before Mr. John E. Daw (Registrar). The net deficiency was returned at £3,473 4s 11d. Causes of failure alleged by debtor were want of capital. Interest on borrowed capital, and losses on the purchase and re-sale of shares. Mr. A. Martin Alford appeared for the debtor, and Mr. Maurice Mathew for Mr. Horsfall, Exeter, the petitioning creditor.
Debtor, examined by the Official Receiver (Mr. Rackwood Cocks), said he had a capital at the start of £40 or £50. He was formerly employed by a firm of commission agents in Queen Street, and prior to that had been assisting his father in a grocery business at Teignmouth. He attributed his losses entirely to Stock Exchange transactions. The whole of the debts had been contracted since July 1920. As a matter of fact, when he got into debt, he could not take up shares bought for clients. He had to buy them subsequently, often at an advanced price. That alone resulted in a total loss to him of £1,400. In addition, he bought shares to cover himself against “an involuntary bear." That also went the wrong way in nearly every instance. If had had capital to control at the proper time, instead of loss, he should have made a profit of £3.000 or £4,000. In nearly every case shares went up subsequent to the purchase. He also lost in connection with underwriting that he took over.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Saturday 08 April 1922

VALUABLE POINTS FOR EXETER

Playing at Exeter in wet weather, yesterday, before only 2,000 spectators, Northampton Town were defeated by Exeter City by two clear goals.
The home men had the advantage of the wind in the first half, but, although they were the better side, they could not score prior to the interval.
Five minutes after change of ends, however, Vowles gave Exeter the lead, and three minutes later Kirk increased his side's advantage.
Exeter had all the best of the play in the second half, but Smith, the Northampton goalkeeper, was in splendid form, and saved finely upon several occasions.
At the other end Graham missed badly when in favourable position, and, later on, Hewison also threw away a good chance.
Just before the finish Lockett, of Northampton, fired in a fine shot, but Fryer brought off a wonderful one-handed save.
The points thus gained are extremely valuable to Exeter, although they are still bottom but one on the Southern Third Division table.
Daily Herald - Tuesday 04 April 1922

EXETER POLICE AND MOTOR. TRAFFIC.

The Chief Constable of Exeter has reported to the Watch Committee with regard to statements made in the Police-court that the number of prosecutions in Exeter against motorists is so excessively high that motorists will be deterred from visiting the city.
These statements (says the Chief-Constable) are absolutely without foundation. During 1921, of the offences reported by the police in which mechanically propelled vehicles were concerned, only 16 per cent, were prosecuted. Exeter has 24 per cent, fewer prosecutions than the average of ten other towns of smaller average size. When it is realised what a large amount law governs the use of mechanically-propelled vehicles, and that in this city some 600,000 of such vehicles pass one point in a year, I think it will be agreed that the number prosecutions are surprisingly small."
The Home Secretary has declined on the ground of expense to allow the engagement for traffic control of men other that policemen.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Saturday 08 April 1922

EXETER PROPERTIES IN THE MARKET.

There was a large attendant the Horse and Groom Hotel, Heavitree, yesterday afternoon, when Messrs. Hussey and Son, Exeter, offered for sale several desirable freehold properties. A corner block cf property, Nos. 65 and 66, Fore-street, Heavitree, having an area of about 8,000 square feet, was withdrawn at £1,200. A freehold shop and dwelling-house, No.1 North Place, North Street, was sold to Mr. J. West, tenant, for £500. Two brick and stone-built and stuccoed and tiled cottages. Nos. 2 and 3, Ellis's Place, Fore Street, bringing in a total rental of 7s 9d per week, were sold to Mr. W. Anning, Heavitree, for £230. A semi-detached dwelling house, brick and stone built, No. 1, Oakfield Street, was sold to the tenant, Mr. F.H. Fry, at £175. Nos. 4, 7, 8, and 10, Oakfield Street, similar houses to the previous lot, and No. 20, Belgrave Road, Paris Street, Exeter, were withdrawn, the bids not reaching the reserve prices, and these houses are now for sale by private treaty. Nos. 3 and 6, Oakfield Street, were sold prior to the auction at satisfactory prices. Messrs. R. T. and H. Campion, Exeter, were the solicitors for the vendors.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Thursday 27 April 1922

OFFENCE AT EXETER.

After his arrest for the present offence, he admitted breaking into a dwelling house at Exeter in October 1920 and stealing a considerable quantity of jewellery and clothing which, he stated, he disposed of to people in Tottenham Court Road. London for sums amounting in the aggregate to nearly £100. Witness produced a warrant for that offence received from the Exeter City Police.
He admitted that in January or February 1920. when serving as a fireman on the S.S. Huntscreen. he stole three blankets when leaving the ship, which he stated, he gave to his wife, but she denied all knowledge of them. He was liberated front Ipswich Prison three days before the commission of the offence with which he was now charged.
Prisoner said that when he got to Plymouth he had no means of support, and his wife “turned hint down." He “could not live on air” and if he begged he would get into trouble. He was unable to obtain employment, and he asked the Recorder to take the Exeter offence into consideration in passing sentence.
“If employment is difficult to obtain there are means of getting some sort of support and keeping away from crime”, said the recorder. He would not send him to penal servitude on that occasion but felt he ought to deal with him pretty severely and passed sentence of 18 months with hard labour.
Western Evening Herald - Saturday 22 April 1922

EXETER'S UNEMPLOYED.
MAYOR'S FUND.

The Exeter unemployed held an open-air demonstration on Saturday evening, when a large number assembled at Buller’s Statue and marched in procession to Bedford Circus where a mass meeting was hold.
Mr. S. Chilcott., who presided, explained the aims and object of the Unemployment Association. Referring to the Mayor’s Fund, he said he thought it would very soon run dry. How were men receiving money from it now going to manage then? The inability of men to carry on with pick and shovel work was brought on solely by lack of sufficient food required by a man to enable him to do a good day’s manual labour.
The Rev. Donald Fraser said the dangerous corners in Exeter and the repair of roads round about, which he considered to be in a disgraceful state, would absorb tremendous number of the unemployed, lit tailed to see why, if £8,000,000 could spent per day on the war to destroy life, a few thousand could not be spent to save life and relieve unemployment.
Mr. C. Foster, the Secretary of the Association, said the Boards of Guardians were sympathetic and only that morning he had received a cheque from a Guardian.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Monday 03 April 1922

EXETER HIPPODROME
NEXT WEEK'S ATTRACTIONS

Exonians will be given the opportunity next week, at the Hippodrome, of seeing the world-famous eccentrics, the Ten Loonies. They are described as the crazy comedy band, and are ten comedians who combine fun with good music. This act, which is presented by Mr. R. J. W. Harris, has had great receptions at every halt visited for the last few years, and is bound to win approval at Exeter. The other turns are all first-class, and include J. H. Scotland, in song, comedy, and dialect: Elsie Sims, a singer of songs Thornbury, the lightning painter and entertainer the Brothers Obo, the popular laughing comedians, in a new burlesque ; and Yoga, who is styled as India's foremost mystic entertainer and who is coming direct from Maskelyne's Theatre of Mystery London, in addition to these turns the film of the Football Association Cup final will be screened throughout the week.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Saturday 29 April 1922

AN EXETER HERO
Rescue from Drowning in the Exe Last Evening

A gallant rescue from drowning was witnessed at Exeter last evening. Albert Wiliiam Page, five and a half years of age, of 3, Clifton Street, fell into the river while-playing on the bank near Gervase Avenue. James Henry Laskey, of 26, Friernhay Street, who was in the neighbourhood, immediately ran to the spot and jumped into the river, which was in flood. The current at this spot was very strong, but Laskey succeeded in getting Page safely to the bank, with the assistance of Henry Godbeer, of Grendon Buildings. P.C. W. E. Parker rendered first aid, and removed the boy to the Star and Garter Inn, where Mrs. Pratt, wrapped him in blankets and the officer took him home.
Western Times - Tuesday 18 April 1922

MINOR ACCIDENTS AT EXETER

There were several minor accidents in Exeter during the weekend. Albert J. Bryant, of 20. Portland Street was riding motorcycle and sidecar in High Street, when a lad stepped from behind a vehicle. In order avoid him, Bryant turned to the left, and in doing so he collided with a cyclist named John Hutchings, 49, Paris Street, who was thrown from his machine. However, neither person was injured.
On Saturday afternoon, Robert Ebenezer Richardson, of Pinhoe Road was proceeding down High Street, in a motor car, when, near Broadgate, he collided with another car, driven by D. F. W. Baden Powell, of Oxford, who was emerging from Broadgate. Both motors were slightly damaged.
On Saturday evening, Frederick Watts, aged 27, of 14 Manston Road, was standing on the table in the Gymnasium of the Y.M.C.A. for the purpose of lighting the gas and, in attempting to get down, his foot caught in the table, and he fell to the floor, sustaining a fractured wrist.
Western Times - Tuesday 11 April 1922

BUS COLLIDES WITH TRAM IN EXETER HIGH STREET

The fore part of tram No.18, which was proceeding up High Street, Exeter, towards the Guildhall, sustained considerable damage yesterday in collision with an Okehampton to Exeter D.M.T. 'bus, which was proceeding in the same direction.
The collision took place just opposite St. Petrock's Church, and was caused apparently by an error judgment on the part of the 'bus driver, who in attempting to pass the tram on the right side took too sharp a curve in swerving round into line with the up-street traffic, with the result that, the rear the 'bus struck the right side fore part of the tram with such force that the front rod supporting the driver's platform was buckled and the dash plate torn off. The vehicle, however, kept to the rails, and was able to proceed later the depot.
Western Times - Tuesday 11 April 1922

DANGEROUS SPEED AT EXETER

At Exeter Police-court, before Messrs. E. C. Perry (in the chair), J. Stocker, J. D. Harris, and P. C. M. Veitch, yesterday, William Edward Hagger, 31, Cambridge Avenue, Kilburn, N.W.6, was summoned for driving motor car Heavitree Road at a speed dangerous to the public on April 7th. George Hart, of Heavitree, said defendant’s car passed him at Liverydole, proceeding in the direction of Heavitree, at estimated speed of 35 miles per hour. Mrs. I. Hart, wife the last witness, corroborated. Sub-Inspector Snell said he was entering Heavitree Road from Polsloe Road when the car passed at a dangerous rate. He held up his hand, and shouted, "Steady! Steady!” but no notice was taken. Defendant, giving evidence, said was not driving 35 miles an hour. He was unaware the corner was dangerous, or he would have slowed up. He did not see a warning notice. Cross-examined by the Chief-Constable: might have been going 25 miles per hour, seeing the road was clear. Mr. P. Steward, defendant's employer, who was in the car, said they were not travelling at a high speed. Mr. H. T. Michelmore, for defendant, said he was ignorant of the district, and the warning sign not in as prominent a position as it might be. The Bench imposed a fine £3 and costs.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Saturday 29 April 1922

EXETER'S WEDDING GIFT. EXETER'S WEDDING GIFT. This exquisite piece of Honiton lace is the wedding present of the City of Exeter to Princess Mary (photos: Heath and Bradnee, Exeter.)
Western Morning News - Friday 24 February 1922

 

This month's selection researched and edited by Pete Martin

January 1922


THE EXETER GAZETTE COMPLETES ITS 150th YEAR

A journalistic event of the weekend was the celebration of "The Devon and Exeter Daily Gazette " of the 150th year of its publication at Exeter. In noting the fact our contemporary mentions that the paper has never ceased publication during that period, and that there are not more than ten papers appearing daily in England which were in existence before 1772, and of these seven—including The Gazette were originally started as weeklies. We congratulate our contemporary on its distinguished record.
The “Gazette” in recording the celebration states: The Exeter Gazette Universal Advertiser for the West of England made its initial appearance in January 1772, when George 111 was King. The price of the paper was 3½d, consisted of four small pages, each of four short columns. Within this comparatively small compass there was found much news of local character, as also that relating to even other parts.
The method by which news was collected was different from that of to-day. Weeks, and sometimes even months, elapsed before details of events of the greatest importance found their way into the hands of those responsible for their publication in the newspapers. The "Exeter Gazette," however, was always to the fore. It’s circulation extended from Land's End to Bristol, Salisbury, and Portsmouth.
The Exeter Gazette - Monday 2 January 1922

EXETER CINEMAS.
LEADING FEATURES FOR CURRENT WEEK.

Another fine programme is on view at the King's Picture House, where “The Man Who Dared" featuring William Russell, attracted large audiences yesterday. The story, which is finely interpreted and screened, is one of love, trickery, and vengeance, and one should miss seeing the film. A fine tonic is “Rent Dodgers”, a laughable comedy. Among other items the “Gaumont Graphic," which illustrates the new game of “Put and Take." "A Double Event," an all-British film, featuring Mary Odette, will occupy the premier place in the latter part of the week, and will be supported by a good programme, including the current episode of the serial “The Hidden Hand."
At the Empire the programme is headed "David and Jonathan," a Samuelson super-production, starring Madge Titherage. The story, adapted from the novel by E. Temple Thurston, is bound to please. The comic side is ably filled by “The Submarine Pirate,"' featuring Syd. Chaplin, and the two-reel absurdity "The Dynamiter," starring Chester Conklin. The “Gaumont Graphic" concludes a pleasing programme. “The Narrow Valley”, a Hepworth film, featuring Alma Taylor and George Dewhurst is booked as the chief attraction at the end of the week, when the opening episode of the serial "The Romance of the Hope Diamond" will also be shown.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Tuesday 03 January 1922

RUNAWAY HORSE AT EXETER

Henry Underdown, butcher, of Cowick Street, Exeter, was driving a horse attached to a waggon from Southernhay into Eastgate, yesterday afternoon, when the animal slipped, and the bridle came off. The animal bolted down High Street as far as Bedford Street, where the waggon collided with an electric standard and broke the harness. The horse continued its career down High Street to Queen Street, where it fell, and before regaining its feet was secured by P.C. Carpenter. The waggon contained three live pigs which escaped injury. The horse received only slight injuries.
Western Times - Wednesday 04 January 1922

62nd WEDDING ANNIVERSARY, EXETER

"Hearty congratulations to yourself and Mrs. Kenney, from 1st R.V. Old Comrades," was the wording of a telegram sent by Mr. W. Wood, the honorary secretary, on Saturday to Mr. James Kenney, of 29, Little Silver, who, and his wife, Saturday celebrated 62nd anniversary of the wedding which took place at Allahabad on January 7th, 1860. Mr. Kenney will be remembered by the older generation of volunteers in the city as Armourer-Sergeant in the 1st R.V., an appointment he received on his discharge to pension from the R.H.A. at Topsham Barracks in 1876. He served with the Battalion for 21 years and was one of the recipients of the Volunteer Long Service medal. He served in the R.H.A. for 22 years, sixteen of which he spent in India, and altogether he wore a uniform for just on 44 years. Like ail Irishmen, Kenny had a "way with him," and he was popular with all ranks in the old 1st R,V. He has resided in the city for about half a century.
Western Times - Monday 09 January 1922

BENCH REFERS TO PUBLIC PROSECUTOR.

Exeter Police-court, before Mr. F T. Depree (in the chair), yesterday, Arthur Tanner Tremaine. 10, Gandy-street, appeared on remand having been charged with a serious offence, at Exeter, on December 1st. Mr. T. J. W. Templeman appeared for the prosecution, and Mr. S. E. Crosse was for the defence.
Mr. Templeman wished to apply for withdrawal of the charge. Last week the prosecution was ready to proceed with the case, but the defence requested further remand for a week, which was granted. That day Mr. Templeman’s client left the city and did not return. She wrote a letter explaining, and did not think it was his duty, or the duty of any advocate, to force his client to give evidence against her will. He therefore requested withdrawal.
The Chairman: We shall have to retire to consider this application. Mr. Templeman: It is a very unusual one to make, in view of the very serious nature of the charge.
Mr. Crosse reminded the Bench that the accused answered, when charged, that he was innocent. He was quite prepared to meet the charge. On returning to Court, Mr. Dupree said the Bench had given the application careful study, and, in view of the extreme seriousness of the charge could not grant the application but had decided to refer the case to the Director of Public Prosecutions. The case would stand adjourned for a fortnight awaiting his decision.
Mr. Templeman: That is very satisfactory.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Thursday 12 January 1922

EXETER ACCIDENTS

John Billett, a youth residing at 33, Haldon Road, Exeter was riding a cycle along Exeter, towards Fore-street, when the front wheel caught in the tram lines. The rider was thrown, and the same time a motor car driven by Robert Howard, residing at 2 Edgerton Park Road, was proceeding behind the cyclist. Before he could pull up, the front near side wheel of the car passed over the back wheel of the cycle, buckling the same, breaking off the mounting step, and damaging the gear case. The cyclist, however, was not injured.
Sidney Tavener. of Stevenstone Farm, Upton Pyne, was riding a horse along Bonhay Road, Exeter, in the direction St. David’s Station, on Saturday, when a motor car, driven by Samuel Hollaway of Alphington Street, going in the same direction, collided the horse, throwing both the animal and rider. The horse sustained a bad cut on the leg, and Taverner was badly shaken.
Western Times - Monday 16 January 1922

ANCIENT CEILING AT EXETER

In the process of demolishing the cottages purchased by the Exeter City Council for the Paul Street improvement, a ceiling, dated 1610, was found in one of the houses in a room about 10 or 12 feet square. The matter was reported to the Council Authorities, and steps have been taken to preserve it. We. understand that the greater part of it is excellent condition. It has not yet been decided by the Estates Committee precisely what shall be done with it, but it will be restored and removed to some place where it can be on view.
Western Times - Tuesday 17 January 1922

MOTOR PARTIES MIRACULOUS ESCAPE, EXETER

An accident fortunately unattended without serious injury, occurred in Sidwell Street, Exeter, just before eleven on Friday evening. A party from Sampford Peverell had attended the Exeter Pantomime and were proceeding on their way home in a motor car, in which were the driver, three ladies and two gentlemen.
Before arriving at St. Anne's Chapel, the car crashed into the electric standard in the middle of the roadway, the light of which was out. The impact was terrific, and the crash could be heard some distance off. Persons in the immediate neighbourhood rushed to their windows, and those in houses overlooking the scene of the accident feared that serious injuries had been sustained by the occupants of the car. Help was soon at hand, and the passengers were got out. It was then found that one of the gentlemen had sustained a badly cut arm while one of the lady occupants had damaged a foot.
The motor car, through dashing into the electric standard, brought down the large arc lamp from the top. This crashed with considerable force onto the body the motor car which was considerably damaged, the radiator and wind screen being smashed, in. whilst the steering gear was placed out of function. Another car was obtained, and the party proceeded, after some time, on their journey to Sampford Peverell. Western Times - Tuesday 17 January 1922

BISHOP AND ACTORS. GRACEFUL COMPLIMENT AT EXETER.

The members of Exeter Theatre Royal pantomime company yesterday had the pleasant experience of being entertained by the Bishop of Exeter and Lady Florence Cecil at the Bishop's Palace. This interesting function is an innovation for Exeter pantomime, and, probably for the whole country, and is doubtless especially gratifying that the talented company who have given Exeter audiences so much enjoyment in this season's presentation of “Sinbad” should in return receive the compliment of a graceful act at the hands of the Bishop and Lady Florence.
The event was of a private nature. Accompanied Mr. Percy M. Duneford, manager of the Theatre Royal, the company were received at the Palace by Lady Florence. They were then, with a number of other guests, given an opportunity of visiting the ancient Cathedral, to which they were conducted through the connecting corridor leading from the Bishop's Palace. Among those who were present, in addition to the Bishop and Lady Florence, were Miss Cecil and Miss Anne Cecil, the Dean Exeter (Dr. H.R. Gamble) and Mrs. Gamble.
Western Morning News - Thursday 19 January 1922

FIRE AT EXETER

About 12.15 this morning the Exeter Fire Brigade received a call by the fire alarm outside the Horse and Groom Hotel, Heavitree, to Mr. T. J. Cook’s motor garage, situate at the rear of the premises of the Ship Hotel. It appears that the driver a largo! J.W.D. motor lorry had loaded up his vehicle with wood and was filling the petrol tank in readiness to proceed on his journey later in the morning. Apparently, the petrol over-flowed on to the exhaust pipe, which was at the time heated, the engine having just previously been started up to see that the motor was in running order, and almost immediately a huge flame went up. The canopy of the lorry was instantaneously enveloped in flames, which shot up to a considerable! height, and ignited a portion of the roof of the shed. The Brigade, under Superintendent Pett, were promptly at the scene with the motor fire engine, and the flames were speedily got under. It was particularly fortunate that the fire was so expeditiously tackled, otherwise there might have been a big blaze, with disastrous consequences. In the shed were two motor petrol lorries, another motor van, and quantity of petrol and oil.
The damage, which, could not be estimated with anything like accuracy this morning, is in the region of £50. The police at the scene were Acting Sergeant. Madge and P.C.s, Dooling, Farrant and Harris. Western Times - Thursday 19 January 1922

RECORD FOR EXETER. CHIPPENDALE SETTEE AND FOUR CHAIRS FETCH £1,210.

The idea that record prices for antiques can only be obtained in the London auction marts was effectually dispelled the Broadgate Mart, Exeter, yesterday, when the price of £1,210 was given by Messrs. M. Harris and Son, Bond-street, London, for a Chippendale three-back settee and four armchairs in Chinese taste, which were included in a sale of antiques and furniture by Messrs. Mark Rowe and Sons.
For about 100 years the settee and chairs have been in the family of the late Mr. S. C. Umfreville, of Ingress Abbey, Kent, and were finally the property of his widow, Mrs. Umfreville, late of Bolealler House, Cullompton. The whole came into the possession of Mr. Umfreville from Alderman Jas. Harmer, Ingress Abbey.
There is no doubt that the price is a record for Chippendale chairs in Exeter. The sale was most satisfactory, with prices a little higher than for the past six months. Competition was very keen, and the sale a distinct indication of further improvement in trade.
Western Morning News - Friday 20 January 1922

CANAL TRAGEDY

An inquest was held by Mr. G. H. Stephens, deputy coroner, at the Stowey Arms, Exminster on Wednesday, on the body of William Lyne, insurance agent, aged 48 years, of 15, Clinton-avenue, Polsloe Park, Exeter.
Mrs. Lyne, widow, stated that her husband left home at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, with the intention of going to his office. He had been suffering from a nervous breakdown and was off duty at the time. The doctor had certified that he was suffering from mental depression.
The discovery of the body was made by Arthur Conibear, aged 16 of 13 Bridge Street, Exeter, who stated that near the Lime Kilns he noticed a hat and mackintosh on the canal banks. In the water he saw the body floating. He rode to Countess Weir for assistance and later recovered the body.
Edward Ellis, of 5, Exe View, Exminster gave evidence of trying artificial respiration for an hour and ten minutes without success. Dr. Worsley, of Topsham, stated that the body bore the usual appearance of death by drowning. The Coroner returned a verdict of “Suicide whilst of unsound mind," and expressed his sympathy with the widow and relatives. Mr. A. Melhuish, who represented the deceased's employers, associated himself with the Coroner's expression of sympathy and said that the deceased's books were in order.
Western Times - Friday 20 January 1922

EXETER MYSTERY

The mysterious disappearance of a 15-year-old schoolgirl is reported at Exeter.
The girl, Eileen Mary Hallett, the daughter of the manager of the Rougemont Hotel, where she resided, left home with a little brown camera at 2.15 yesterday afternoon with the intention of going to the Rougemont grounds to take some photographs, and was expected to return at 4.30. But except for the fact that she was seen to leave the Rougemont grounds at about 3 o’clock and proceed in the direction of Northernhay, nothing has since been heard of her. Western Morning News - Saturday 21 January 1922

CHARGED WITH BIGAMY.

Martin Banfield, age 46, a grocer, of South-street, Exeter, appeared before Exeter magistrates yesterday, charged with bigamously marrying Emily Maria Bidgood, his wife Bertha, of Richmond-lane, Plymouth, being then alive.
Mr. M. J. McGahey appeared for accused. The Chief Constable (Mr. A. F. Nicholson) said defendant's real name was William Martin Banfield. On July 8 1899 ,he was married in the name of William Martin to Bertha Husband at the Registry Office, Plymouth. They lived together at Plymouth for some time, and a child was born. During time that his wife was abed he took all the money and left, leaving her penniless. She met him 11 months later by accident at Plymouth, when he persuaded her to live with him again. Afterwards they lived in Exeter for two years. Once more he left her, later communicating with her from Plymouth, and they again lived together. Another child was born in September 1907 and all went well until October 17 1914 when he left her again. She remained at Plymouth.
The defendant met lady’s maid, Emily Bidgood, and in 1916 she left her situation and went to London. He followed, posing as a single man, and on July 5, 1918, she was married to him at Paddington Registry Office, where he gave his name as Williams. In 1919 he purchased a grocery business at Exeter, and on October 1st his lawful wife discovered him and he left the city. From that time the lady of the second marriage had not seen or heard anything of him.
Western Morning News - Saturday 21 January 1922

HOUSEBREAKING AT EXETER

Margaret Burns, a domestic servant, of no fixed address, was charged with breaking and entering St. Elizabeth's Home, Bartholomew Street, between the hours of 6 and 8 p.m., on the 15th inst., and stealing three gold rings, one £1 Treasury note, and 8s 6d in cash, the property of Evelyn Langton and Minnie Rand. Defendant pleaded guilty and elected to dealt with by the magistrates.
The Chief Constable said that defendant was employed at the Home, by doing cleaning and household duties. On Sunday, 15th January, at 6 p.m., the Matron in charge went to church. Before leaving she went to a chest of drawers to get some money. She left a Treasury note and 18s 6d in silver. The doors, front and back, were locked, and the windows secured. On returning the Matron found a pane of glass broken in the window, and one of the doors unlocked. £1 8s 6d was missing from the chest of drawers and the gold rings were missing from the linen cupboard. The police were informed, and the defendant was suspected. A pawn ticket in respect of one of the rings was found on her.
The Chief Constable said defendant had been before the Court eleven times previously.
The Bench sentenced defendant to six months' hard labour, and she went below weeping bitterly.
Western Times - Tuesday 24 January 1922

EXETER SHOPPING WEEK

A meeting of the Exeter Shopping Week Association was held at No. 17, Bedford Circus, last night, Mr. W. O. Wills (Chairman) presiding. The Secretary (Mr. P. J. Durden) said the dates that had been decided upon were from the 30th March to April 7th, and that would give the Shopping Week two clear Fridays. The event would be opened by the Mayor at the Guildhall. The Hospitality and Amusement Committees were considering whether it would not as well to let off a maroon, and that men with bells, dressed as town criers, announce the fact at Exe Bridge and St. Sidwell's Fountain. It was also thought that they may obtain the services of two trumpeters, and that fanfares of trumpets be given. All the streets will be decorated with flags, and it was thought wise to have banners in various parts of the City with certain catch phrases, such as "Get it at Exeter," "Exeter, the bargain market," etc. In the centre of the City, at Queen-street, would be a four-cross, decoration of evergreens with a novel design in the centre. It was suggested that the design would illustrate that Exeter was the shopping centre of the West. The City Council had been approached with a view to asking them to light the streets during the Week at least as well as pre-war days, with the large arc lamps and higher power lights in the side streets. Shopkeepers would be asked to keep their premises lit until 10 o'clock.
Western Times - Tuesday 24 January 1922

INFLUENZA IN EXETER

Although Exeter, in common with most towns, is suffering from an abnormal number of cases of influenza, the epidemic appears to be in a milder form than usual. The death returns show that during the week ending Saturday last there were only two fatal cases in the city due to influenza, one being in St. Thomas.
In some previous years on the prevalence influenza in epidemic form, the City Health Authority has issued handbills containing instructions to the public as to the measures to be individually taken against attack, and the best methods of treatment of the ailment. It may be useful to give the gist of them. People are advised to avoid overcrowded places, infected houses, and people, frequently wash the mouth and gargle the throat with salt and water or a little Condy's fluid in water. The mixture should also be sniffed up the nostrils and expelled through the mouth, for it is through the nose and mouth that the infection gets into the body. When attacked, the patient should at once keep indoors in a warm room free from draughts.
Mr. A. Badcoe, the Secretary for Education, informed a "Western Times" representative yesterday that the prevalence of the epidemic is having a serious effect on the school attendance. In one of the largest schools as many as ninety children have been absent through illness, and although it cannot be said that all were absent through influenza, the latter was the cause in the majority of cases.
Western Times - Thursday 26 January 1922

EXETER HIPPODROME. NEXT WEEK'S ATTRACTIONS

Next week's show at Exeter Hippodrome is one the most expensive on record and is of great variety, and every artiste on the bill is paying a first visit to the city. Bernhart and Young, “fellows of infinite jest," and Rich Hayes, “the lazy juggling clown," share the top of the bill. With such leading exponents of their respective entertainments, patrons can be sure being put upon happy terms with themselves. The Musical Astleys will appear in a bright instrumental entertainment, while a notable vocal turn is that of James Heys, operatic tenor. Eva Vere and Monty Morris will present a novel speciality act, while The Hassans, described as the greatest of French gymnasts, foot the bill. The programme strikes us as being one of all round merit and admirably calculated to satisfy every temperament. It not often that a bill consists in its entirety of “first visits", and when it is backed by known quality there should no question about “full houses" at the Hippodrome throughout next week. There will be, in addition to the half-dozen turns, special pictures on the bioscope.
Exeter and Plymouth Gazette - Saturday 28 January 1922

ENGLISHMAN'S HOME AT EXETER. Winter run Mrs Purser and her baby at their "home" in a field near Exeter. The tent was constructed by her husband, and ex-soldier, because no better accommodation is available
Western Morning News - Tuesday 24 January 1922

 

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