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Most recent 27th July 2015

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Portrait of Exeter citizen

Marrianne Faithful photographed in her dressing room at the ABC, Exeter, probably in February 1965 when she appeared with Roy Orbison and the Rockin' Berries.Portrait of Exeter citizen The comedian Tony Hancock frequently performed in Exeter, both at the Theatre Royal and the Savoy/ABC. Here he poses for a photo with the manager of the ABC, Robert 'Bob' Parker, and a young woman. Circa 1962. Photo © the late Frank Mallett.

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New - Exeter Pubs by David Cornforth. Also explore the British Newspaper Archive for free. Help fund Exeter Memories
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Exeter Emblem

This graphic appeared on the rear of the official Exeter City Council guidebooks for about 15 years, from the 1920s to 1942.

This site currently contains 900 pages and more than 5,000 images.

Exeter Local History Society

Join the Exeter Local History Society and discover 2000 years of the history of Exeter. Learn of intrigue, plots, disasters, celebrations and the way of life of past generations of the city.

We meet six times a year in the city centre, for a chat, and a talk from an expert on a historical topic. There are also 'outside visits' with a guide to see aspects of the city's past.

Come along to a meeting without obligation - upcoming meetings can be found here

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Featured Photos

EMThe old house of Gabriels Wharf on Shilhay. Most of Shilhay was a wharf and sawmill, with one end devoted to tallow and candle production. The building became a doss house before it was demolished. Photo Alan H Mazonowicz.EMAn old house in the old Frog Street. This and other historic buildings were lost when the Frog Street tunnel became an underpass and Yaraslav Way was driven through from South Street to the Exe Bridges.

One hundred years ago this SEPTEMBER
This Month in Exeter - 1915 also see 1913 and 1914
LOCAL AND DISTRICT NEWS
The delightful summer weather experienced Exeter recently was broken by a heavy rainstorm yesterday morning.
The Registrar-General reports that the annual rate of mortality in Exeter and Plymouth last week was 9 per 1,000 of the inhabitants, while that for the 96 great towns of England and Wales averaged 12.3.
A little boy, named Heppell, whose parents live in Kings-road, was taken to the Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital yesterday afternoon with a fractured shoulder. He ran out of the enclosure at the bottom of Pinhoe-road where Messrs. Anderton and Rowlands' fair has been stationed, and a motor-car knocked him down. The chauffeur at once took the lad to the hospital in the car.
Western Times - Thursday 02 September 1915
NO PUTTEES
To be Worn by Soldiers in the Trenches

The War Office has decided to abandon puttees and adopt long boots as part of the equipment of our soldiers in the trenches.
Puttees will be retained for home service and for marching purposes.
The decision has been taken in deference to representations that puttees are unsuited for use in the trenches, especially in the winter.
This view is fully borne out by the experience of our troops the front. The change will take effect without delay.
(editors note - at that time Coldharbour Mill near Uffculme was the only producer of woollen cloth for puttees in the country)
Western Times - Monday 06 September 1915
King and Queen visit Exeter
During the eighteen centuries of unbroken existence which the City of Exeter can boast there have been numerous Royal visits. But never did King or Queen set foot in the “Ever Faithful” with a more laudable object than yesterday, when King George end Queen Mary arrived in the city to show their personal interest in the gallant soldiers who are being treated at the V.A.O. Hospitals in the city and neighbourhood, and their appreciation of the splendid work carried out by the medical and nursing staffs of those Hospitals. Although the visit was kept as private as possible, many thousands of people lined the route taken by their Majesties, and sincerest loyalty was displayed. Continued here

The Exeter 'Comment' from Exeter Memories

This site is run by a resident of who loves the city

Exeter Pubs by David Cornforth

Exeter PubsOver the past few centuries, nearly 500 pubs have opened their doors in Exeter. While many have been lost due to time, money or misfortune, the stories and memories created in these 'locals' live on. Exeter Pubs offers a captivating glimpse into the history of some of Exeter's most famous pubs. Drawing upon an eclectic collection of photographs, David Cornforth presents the reader with an insight into the history and life of the pubs in this area. From pub dogs to landlords, famous visitors to suspicious fires, this book tells the stories of Exeter's numerous watering holes. Just like countless travellers over the centuries, the modern reader is encouraged to stop for a pint in each and continue the stories of these historic establishments. Well-researched and beautifully illustrated, Exeter Pubs provides something for everyone, whether they have lived in Exeter all their lives, or whether they are just visiting this vibrant town. Available from Amazon Exeter Pubs (Amberley Pub)

Exeter City go to Argentina

It was a hundred years ago that Exeter City went to Argentina to teach the locals something about football. On the 22 May 1914, the team, along with team officials and WAGS (yep, that's right or maybe they were wives of officials, and they sure wore bonny hats!) left Exeter Queen Street station for Southampton, for a boat to Argentina.See photo on this page May 1914. In July 1914 they had the honour of playing the Brazil national side, losing 2-0, when they toured South America.

Exeter Memories on Facebook and Twitter

Exeter Memories has a Page and a Group on Facebook. The group is for people to swap memories of living in the city – at the moment, the 1960s and 70s are very popular. You can also follow #ExeterMemories on Twitter, where the latest pages are promoted and events that happened on the day are linked.

Historic Buildings of Exeter - iBook for your iPad

Published on the 1 December 2012 is the Exeter Memories iBook Historic Buildings of Exeter. Liberally illustrated with full screen photographs, illustartions and maps, the interactive book covers fourteen of Exeter's most loved buildings. The photos look stunning on the Retina display of the iPad 3, while the new iPad Mini is a convenient way to view the book. If you have an iPAd and love Exeter, this is the eBook for you. Moderately priced at £2.49, the book is available from iTunes here - Historic Buildings of Exeter - David Cornforth

Downloads to Support Exeter Memories

Exeter Memories has never had any Google ads, nor any other form of income generation. To help finance the hosting of the site I have added three downloads, that can be purchased for £2 each. Click on the PURCHASE button on any page to see the downloads. There is the choice of seven large sized, hi-res map files of the city, or two eBooks — Charles Worthy's The History of the Suburbs of Exeter and the charming James Cossins' Reminiscences of Exeter Fifty Years Since. Both books can be purchased in ePub (Sony, Nook etc) format or Kindle format Screen readers can also be downloaded for your computer - see free Adobe Reader. Please support Exeter Memories by purchasing a download.

That's all for now,

David Cornforth - My Contact E-Mail